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Admissions, enrollment, marketing, retention and financial aid administrators surveyed generally have a sunny outlook about the student population in 2018.

Higher ed leaders love an opportunity to tout the beauty of their campuses, and continuous construction gives them a lot to talk about.

Here are seven things higher ed search leaders and administrators believe campus administrators must do in the coming year to get the job done.

While relying less on student tuition and fees is the ideal situation for many higher ed institutions, it’s not surprising that finance administrators anticipate tuition revenue as the biggest funding boost for 2018.

“No margin, no mission!” is how one respondent to UB’s 2018 Outlook survey of campus leaders described the high stakes involved in raising more tuition revenue, non-tuition revenue and fundraising dollars in 2018.

We asked: What are your predictions, hopes and concerns for 2018? Administrators and experts who have recently contributed to UB answered.

As colleges and universities find new ways to partner with each other to improve services and reduce costs, the idea of sharing an LMS is starting to gain traction.

Gather stakeholders—including faculty, students, IT leaders and others—for honest discussion. 

In California, it was crucial to include student representation in the statewide committee that examined various LMS candidates, says Jory Hadsell, executive director of California Community Colleges’ Online Education Initiative.

That positive approach allowed college constituency groups to focus on the end goal of student learning.  

In what ways could sharing an LMS benefit colleges, and what do you see as the biggest or most surprising challenge institutions would need to overcome to purchase the same LMS? 

“Sharing an LMS across institutions provides many benefits, including consolidation through one system, categorizing content and cross-collaboration. One of the challenges of sharing an LMS is agreeing on a design model that satisfies the lowest common denominator.

Colleges and universities face growing pressure to offer students single rooms.

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