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Here’s how four institutions are bridging the gap between their campuses and students based in rural areas. 

From wayfinding to making appointments to payment transactions, students and others move through their busy days with the assistance of interactive electronic kiosks.

Why are kiosks important on campuses and how can colleges better use the technology?

“Making student self-service kiosks available in more campus locations and providing secure, on-demand access to student account information is a recipe for success. Having the ability to utilize these resources 24/7 is a natural fit for students and faculty; and with the right kiosk solution, ID verification, document scanning and form submission capabilities provide instant value and convenience.”

—Margo Bowie, marketing manager, Advanced Kiosks

1. Tackle issues head-on and promptly.

This may be especially important for tech staff who ignore policies, fail to carry their load or can’t seem to get along with co-workers.

“Don’t let the bad behavior of a few poison those who want to work,” says CIO Yvette Brown Koottungal at Barry University in Florida. She is also vice president for technology at the university, where she manages a team of 63.

Developing and maintaining a strong customer service ethos sometimes brings IT managers into unexpected territory. Following are tips on how to handle four such scenarios.

As the trend in active learning classrooms has accelerated internationally, colleges in the U.S. can learn from the cutting-edge classroom design and technology that other countries have built.

Why should U.S. colleges and universities follow global trends in active classrooms? What is the biggest lesson administrators can learn?

Leading the charge: Office of Institutional Research at Shawnee State University in Ohio

Phase 1 (recently completed)

The three-person office built relationships with the finance office, registrar and admissions office to better understand data concerns and determine where silos could be broken down.


Link to main story: Connecting data silos in higher ed

Quiz: Are data silos a problem on your campus?

Here’s what several higher ed institutions are doing to break down or connect data silos.

Leading the charge: 12 representatives from all departments at Baldwin Wallace University in Ohio

Phase 1 (three years ago)

The team began with an “amnesty period” in which members showed each other the data they captured and discussed how it could be shared and used. Progress: “Everyone began to see there were all types of efficiencies that could be created by working together and consolidating reports,” says Greg Flanik, chief information officer.

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