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Developing a successful model for creating an e-textbook program is key to taking digital course materials to the next step of widespread use. Here are three ways to design an e-textbook initiative.

One decision to be made in launching or expanding an e-textbook program is whether the office managing it should be on the business or the academic side.

Here are two options. 

Campus store

Since the retail manager negotiates the costs of digital course materials anyway, many institutions choose this administration model. Cornell University houses its e-textbook program in The Cornell Store.

What is the most important factor in ensuring an e-textbook initiative is successful, and is there anything administrators tend to miss in planning that, if handled better, would result in a more successful program?

“We’ve seen that successful programs often start as small pilots. Instructors might begin with simple e-books and then move into more powerful adaptive learning software. Many of them then launch inclusive access or immediate access programs that save students money and deliver materials on day one.”

In what ways could colleges use digital signage installations to generate revenue, and are there any roadblocks you have seen preventing them from doing so?

“Digital signage can engage students while providing an avenue for revenue. At the campus bookstore, digital technology can leverage analytics to trigger meaningful content. For example, if a student picks up a baseball cap on sale, a digital display above the item can recommend additional merchandise such as sweatpants or a t-shirt.”

Video analytics has been considered the next big thing in campus security. But the surveillance technology, also known as video content analysis, is just beginning to catch the eye of higher ed security administrators.

What is the biggest roadblock to widespread use of video analytics technology?

“ROI. Understanding how to design and implement solutions that work with the analytics system—and not against it—make the difference. Campuses offer a diverse environment with a range of challenges. Proper design and deployment can yield a measurable return on investment.”

—Jammy DeSousa, senior product manager, security products, building technologies and solutions, Johnson Controls

In the two years since Northern Arizona University launched a virtual 360-degree campus tour, more than 30,000 people have explored the campus virtually.

The disconnect between students’ digital lives and their classroom experience is narrowing as professors are increasingly embedding video in their courses—for both in-person and online learning.

Here are some examples of content ideas for interactive video content as well as best practices that are already employed by various universities and colleges across the U.S.

Below is a closer look at how two universities, Butler University in Indiana and the University of Florida, are enhancing learning videos for their online courses.

Butler University: Adding quizzes to video

Technology used: Panopto video platform for recording lectures

Interactive boosts: Voiceover can be added to PowerPoint slides. When the instructor finds a place in the presentation to add a quiz, the video gets edited and a multiple-choice, true/false or multiple-answers type of question can be inserted.

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