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As the trend in active learning classrooms has accelerated internationally, colleges in the U.S. can learn from the cutting-edge classroom design and technology that other countries have built.

Why should U.S. colleges and universities follow global trends in active classrooms? What is the biggest lesson administrators can learn?

Leading the charge: Office of Institutional Research at Shawnee State University in Ohio

Phase 1 (recently completed)

The three-person office built relationships with the finance office, registrar and admissions office to better understand data concerns and determine where silos could be broken down.


Link to main story: Connecting data silos in higher ed

Quiz: Are data silos a problem on your campus?

Here’s what several higher ed institutions are doing to break down or connect data silos.

Leading the charge: 12 representatives from all departments at Baldwin Wallace University in Ohio

Phase 1 (three years ago)

The team began with an “amnesty period” in which members showed each other the data they captured and discussed how it could be shared and used. Progress: “Everyone began to see there were all types of efficiencies that could be created by working together and consolidating reports,” says Greg Flanik, chief information officer.

Are data silos a big problem in higher ed, and what are the most important reasons for taking them down?

Q: What can higher ed institutions do to best protect themselves from technical vulnerabilities that most people would not expect are vulnerabilities (for example, wireless printers)?

“The most important thing organizations can do is ensure they have visibility into every layer of their IT environment—from the network perimeter all the way down to the endpoints. The more an IT team knows about what is connected to the network, the more effectively they can secure it.”

—Joe Aronow, product architect, Cisco Meraki

Quiz: Is your cybersecurity policy effective?

At the Internet of Things Village of the DEF CON security conference in 2016, hacking contests revealed nearly 50 vulnerabilities in 23 devices from 21 manufacturers.

As more colleges make dual-enrollment classes available online, new options are emerging for structuring classes, boosting student/teacher interaction and ensuring content rigor. Here are some successful approaches.

An increase in technology spending is the gift that about 4 in 10 campus technology administrators are unwrapping to start the new year. Sixteen percent of the 96 respondents to a UB survey, however, must deal with a decrease in spending.

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