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Banking executives discuss how higher ed institutions are doing in their efforts to teach students to be responsible about their finances while in school and in future stages of life.

Outside of online and in-person financial literacy sessions, colleges and universities are finding innovative strategies to guide students toward being more financially responsible in both their college and adult lives.

GETTING FINANCES IN ORDER—The Student Wellness Center at Ohio State provides a variety of services to support overall wellness, including financial education. Through one-hour sessions, trained volunteer peer coaches help with financial goal setting, banking basics, budgeting and debt repayment.

Before a higher ed institution partners with a bank to provide financial literacy programming, answering these four questions will determine how such a partnership should be structured in a way that is beneficial to all parties.

How can college retail leaders compete with e-commerce? It’s time to get back to basics. Here are five strategies for staying relevant.

Providers answer: What do you see as the biggest revenue-related challenge facing campus stores today?

Here’s the rundown for Colgate University, San Diego State University, Clayton State University, Columbus State Community College, Seward County Community College and California State University, Long Beach.

In its report “Navigating The New Normal: Financial Imperatives For MSI Effectiveness and Avoiding Financial Exigency,” the Southern Education Foundation suggests that trustees could better understand their institutions’ financial health with answers to these questions.

1. What is the discount rate for entering freshmen versus for continuing students?

2. What is the blended discount rate?

Following are three key questions campus leaders must consider when offering financial training to the board of trustees.

Most institutions have barely scratched the surface of the latest innovations in mobile fundraising. Here are key actions recommended by those who are making headway.

It’s extremely challenging and costly to build an in-house mobile donation platform, not only because of the technology, but also because of privacy and compliance issues.

That’s why most universities choose to work with providers that have it all figured out, says Caryn Stein, vice president of  marketing at higher ed consulting firm Ruffalo Noel Levitz.

When vetting a vendor, keep these questions in mind:

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