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Cloud email

Numerous advantages are driving cloud email adoption. Migrating email to the cloud offers campuses substantial financial savings and eliminates on-site mail system infrastructure. Schools avoid email server backups, shrink email support time, off-load maintenance, and bypass the need for server-based anti-virus, anti-spam and email filtering products, according to Rich Brown, founder of Dartware, a network monitoring software developer, and a former network manager at Dartmouth College. Decent uptime (when service is up without any downtime) is usually a benefit, as well.

Small Animal Hospital

Veterinary students who once huddled together to observe a surgeon's intricate moves now have another learning option at the University of Florida. There, AMX technology allows students near and far to have a bird's eye view of every small step of a procedure.

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Bill Cooper didn't mince words when Stanford University officials contacted him about coming on board as their director of purchasing. "I said, 'No, I'm not interested in a fragmented function and I'm not interested in an institution that has just a director of purchasing,'" recalls Cooper, who now has an office at ... Stanford.

American colleges and universities are breeding grounds for innovative ideas and open information sharing. Pair that with a large number of systems on a given network and a vulnerable student population with fresh credit and you've got an appealing target for identity thieves.

What do you see as today’s biggest challenge in operating a campus mailroom? Is there anything colleges tend to do that makes the problem worse?

Not all campus mail centers are actually run by the institution.

The mailroom is becoming a more visible and important part of auxiliary services at colleges across the country, with some institutions overhauling their facilities completely to accommodate the new technology that streamlines service.

Every school needs a reliable water supply—no matter the climate—yet it is often the most overlooked aspect of facilities management.

Badges have not just motivated students to take a deeper look at the skills they’ve earned. Several institutions also issue badges for professional development. 

SCHOLARLY PURSUITS— SUNY Oneonta awards badges to participants in its annual Research and Creativity Day. Each April, students present projects—from research papers to video documentaries—they’ve completed independently and with faculty mentors.

Diplomas—those venerable printed documents that lack hotlinks and interactivity features—have lost some of their luster.

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