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The Health Sciences Library at the University of Washington formed a partnership in the summer of 2015 with the Institute of Translational Health Sciences, the University of Washington Medicine Research Information Technology, and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine-Pacific Northwest Region.

The partnership sought to create and fund a space on campus that would accelerate health research and innovation by supporting researchers and investigators and allowing a multifaceted approach to research.

Which major is best for me? How do I plan my courses? How do I succeed in my courses? What is my career strategy after college? These are all questions students tend to have throughout their educational journey.

Demonstrating on-time completion and positive student outcomes is a major challenge facing today’s colleges and universities. Students and families are expecting institutions to provide the tools and support services to ensure students secure the necessary skills and competencies to prepare them for a successful life.

Students today don’t respond to the traditional methods of communication from their college or university like they once did. While websites and email are appropriate for housing and delivering certain types of information, institutions need to develop a campus-wide mobile presence in order to reach students effectively and in the format they prefer. 

In the race to attract, retain and prepare students, the institutions with the most relevant programs and most current technologies have an advantage. Hands-on learning through 3D printing at a college or university opens doors to entrepreneurship and industry collaborations that benefit budding scientists, engineers, artists and designers by preparing them for the requirements of the knowledge-based economy.

Often, student success efforts are focused primarily on retaining first-year students, but fail to continue supporting students throughout their college careers. At the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, the institution’s leadership wanted to take a broader approach to student success by developing a predictive model that would include upperclassmen. 

George Bruton, CEO/Founder, SkoolLive

How did you come up with the idea for SkoolLive? 

Students today have varying needs and expectations when it comes to banking as well as receiving funds like financial aid disbursements. And with the evolving needs of millennials it’s difficult to ensure all your students’ needs are being met, especially those who may not be able to or wish not to bank with traditional financial institutions.

Many institutions struggle with the consequences of using multiple IT platforms for managing operations across departments, such as IT Support, Admissions, HR, Marketing, Residence Life or Facilities. The results—dissatisfied students and faculty, miscommunication, redundancy and poor resource allocation among them—can negatively impact the institution in a variety of ways.

At the University of Trinidad and Tobago, recording lectures was once a cumbersome technology dance. From loaner cameras and SD cards to burning and distributing DVDs, the process was disconnected from the teaching and learning objectives and produced no measurable results. The university aligned its efforts by transitioning to an active flipped classroom.

The year was 2009 and Central Piedmont Community College was having trouble getting refunds and financial aid disbursements into the hands of students of the multi-campus school in Charlotte, North Carolina.

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