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While gathering various types of assessment data can be vital to help college and university leaders identify areas for improvement and to influence strategic decision-making, it can be challenging to make sense of this data, and to act accordingly. Benchmarking can address this challenge by providing a better understanding of the data, identifying which results are outstanding or concerning, and helping higher ed leaders to establish goals for their institution.

Campus mail centers have changed dramatically. Due to the rise of e-commerce, many campuses are overwhelmed with package deliveries, and campus mail centers are struggling to keep pace. This trend is forecast to continue for the foreseeable future, resulting in disgruntled students and wasted resources. Leading institutions have found solutions—innovative technology which enables campus mail centers to become efficient, flexible and responsive to this changing environment.

Delivering online learning has become crucial to satisfying the demands of nontraditional learners—who are quickly becoming considered “new traditional” learners. Meeting these evolving demands is a moving target for institutions, and as a result there are a variety of important considerations that are vital to building a program that succeeds both today and in the future.

Collaborative work is key to a student’s success in the workforce of today and tomorrow. Today’s students expect their campus learning spaces to be technology-enabled environments that provide seamless collaboration and wireless connectivity, but creating these spaces can be challenging for institutions, as there are a variety of issues to consider, from room layout to the “digital divide.”

Conducting meaningful conversations with stakeholders is vital to inform and validate the strategic direction of any institution. However, many traditional methods of gathering this input—such as surveys or town hall meetings—are flawed and can be misleading, often being disproportionately influenced by the loudest or most negative voices.

Administrators, faculty and staff at the State University of New York College at Old Westbury are committed to the success of every one of their nearly 5,000 students. So when the sprawling Long Island school started looking for a new campus card system a few years ago, all roads led to TouchNet OneCard VIP.

For seven years, Southern University and A&M College used a complicated document management system that didn’t work with its new student information system from Banner. So departments rarely used the SIS, and students spent time providing the same information to different departments and completing routine administrative responsibilities at the historically black college in Baton Rouge.

Why are more institutions moving their key systems to the cloud?

FedEx Office opened a location in the Danforth bookstore of Washington University in St. Louis more than a decade ago, offering services that were not found on campus before its opening.

WashU wanted to provide students and staff an easy way to get projects completed without the inconvenience of having to leave the university, so the relationship with FedEx Office was a natural fit.

When it comes to professional development and compliance training for faculty, staff and student employees, many institutions rely on a large number of siloed, separate systems. By moving to a central, shared learning platform, institutions are able to track and report on the progress of training, plan better for the future, and more effectively meet business needs across departments.

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