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From left to right: Jon MacMillan, Senior Data Analyst, Rapid Insight; Charles Ansell, Chief Operating Officer, Community College System of New Hampshire

Every institution has access to data that can help to drive more effective decision-making; the challenge is that often it resides in silos around campus. By democratizing data access across the institution and building a data-focused campus culture, staff are empowered to make more effective decisions.

From left to right: Kristen Wallitsch, Associate Dean of Academic Support Student Success Center, Bellarmine University; Drew Thiemann, Director of Institutional Research & Effectiveness, Bellarmine University; Jim Breslin, Dean of Student Success, Bellarmine University

Predictive analytics can serve as the foundation of student success efforts. By drawing together data from disparate campus sources and systems, predictive analytics software can enable institutional leaders to predict the likelihood of student attrition, and to identify at-risk students and match them with the right resources that can help them succeed.

When the leadership of the Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC) in Pennsylvania began searching for a new platform for campus payments, they knew that student success relies on great technology in the business office as well as the classroom. They also knew that with the right payment options and plans, they could ensure that the college’s affordable, quality education was even more accessible to members of the community.

Today’s students have expectations that their courses provide flexible, easy-to-access video content and blended learning environments, but implementing video such as lecture capture platforms at scale across campus—and in a way that drives student success—can be challenging.

Student loan debt—as well as delinquency and defaults—continue to be serious concerns among students, alumni, parents, higher ed institutions and their communities. The financial burdens on students can negatively impact both their success while enrolled and after graduation, as well as the enrollment, finances and public image of institutions as a whole.

While gathering various types of assessment data can be vital to help college and university leaders identify areas for improvement and to influence strategic decision-making, it can be challenging to make sense of this data, and to act accordingly. Benchmarking can address this challenge by providing a better understanding of the data, identifying which results are outstanding or concerning, and helping higher ed leaders to establish goals for their institution.

Campus mail centers have changed dramatically. Due to the rise of e-commerce, many campuses are overwhelmed with package deliveries, and campus mail centers are struggling to keep pace. This trend is forecast to continue for the foreseeable future, resulting in disgruntled students and wasted resources. Leading institutions have found solutions—innovative technology which enables campus mail centers to become efficient, flexible and responsive to this changing environment.

Delivering online learning has become crucial to satisfying the demands of nontraditional learners—who are quickly becoming considered “new traditional” learners. Meeting these evolving demands is a moving target for institutions, and as a result there are a variety of important considerations that are vital to building a program that succeeds both today and in the future.

Collaborative work is key to a student’s success in the workforce of today and tomorrow. Today’s students expect their campus learning spaces to be technology-enabled environments that provide seamless collaboration and wireless connectivity, but creating these spaces can be challenging for institutions, as there are a variety of issues to consider, from room layout to the “digital divide.”

Conducting meaningful conversations with stakeholders is vital to inform and validate the strategic direction of any institution. However, many traditional methods of gathering this input—such as surveys or town hall meetings—are flawed and can be misleading, often being disproportionately influenced by the loudest or most negative voices.

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