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Mobile applications are on the rise as the method for communicating with a university’s expansive audience. Though apps have the potential to deliver content in a new, dynamic way, many higher ed leaders are unsure how to best deploy an effective mobile app strategy. This web seminar, originally broadcast on May 7, 2013, addressed how the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) was able to successfully release an effective app for its campus community.

Game days at university campuses tend to generate a large amount of waste, which is costly to the environment and the institution. To demonstrate its devotion to sustainability, the University of Arizona partnered with Waste Management to implement an extensive recycling program at its football stadium during the 2012 season, successfully diverting over 25 tons of trash from the landfill.

Employing resource management software (RMS) can help higher education institutions maximize A/V, financial, and personnel resources. Additionally, the automation provided by RMS can increase A/V equipment efficiency. This web seminar, originally broadcast on April 9, 2013, was the final in the three-part “Automate Innovation” series and focused on how the University of Minnesota centrally controls its A/V hardware, maximizes sustainability, and improves efficiency through RMS.


“Generation C” is demanding video in all aspects of their lives, including in their learning experiences. Universities ought to harness the power of academic video not only to meet these expectations, but to realize the power of lecture capture, personalized education, and flipped classrooms. In this web seminar hosted by Sonic Foundry vice president Sean Brown and originally presented on August 20, 2013, JD Solomon of University Business presented some findings from a new white paper about how academic video is at a tipping point and what its future looks like.

In light of President Obama’s recent speech outlining his goals for higher education, the need to become more transparent, accountable and efficient has become particularly acute for those charged with managing student financial aid, says Linda Ding, education program strategist for Laserfiche.

It wasn’t long ago that most of what went on behind the scenes at Oklahoma Christian University (OC) was paper-based and cumbersome. Realizing they needed to do a better job of meeting students’ expectations, OC’s Director of Student Financial Services, Clint LaRue, collaborated with Vice President of Information Technology John Hermes, found a way to move the department into the 21st century and provide better customer service.

President Obama’s recent speech outlining his plan to make higher education more affordable had as its centerpiece the intent to hold institutions receiving federal funding more accountable for how well they’re serving their students. Congressional approval is required to turn Obama’s proposal into actionable legislation. But if it does pass, colleges and universities will face greater scrutiny than ever before. Much of this attention will be directed at student financial aid departments, compelling them to become more efficient, accountable, and transparent in their operations.

As more students and faculty started bringing their own digital devices to campus, the University of Ottawa in Ontario, Canada recognized the need for more interactive learning at the bilingual public research institution. The university responded by employing flipped classrooms, in which the traditional lecture and homework elements are reversed; active learning, in which students read, write, and discuss topics instead of listening to lectures; and specialized spaces, providing educational environments geared toward tech-savvy students and staff.

For Texas A&M University faculty moving from one Liberal Arts and Humanities smart classroom to another, there is no learning curve. That’s because classrooms and conference rooms in the department have standardized equipment. The College Station, Texas, university’s Instructional Media Services Department installed an AMX controller and touch panel in every room, a move that keeps the comfort level high for instructors.

The focal point of Queensland University of Technology’s brilliant new Science and Engineering Centre is known as The Cube—part science lab, part digital engagement, and the hub of scientific exploration for the Australian university's community, as well as high school students and the public at large.