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A comment CIO Ravi Ravishanker consistently heard when Wellesley College hired him nine years ago was that the Massachusetts school needed a new ERP system. The 1,100 employees at the women’s liberal arts college wanted a cloud-based solution that anyone could use.

“Unfortunately, there weren’t many choices available at the time, so I renewed our current system to buy some time,” says Ravishanker.

From left to right: Lisa Brown, Ph.D., Program Manager, eLearning & Innovation, Montana State University; Colin Smith, M.Ed., Senior Manager, Teaching and Learning Technologies, Montana State University.

Research shows that the use of academic video has the potential to dramatically improve teaching and learning. But too often, the use of video on campus is limited to traditional lecture capture, and driving adoption across the institution can be challenging.

This web seminar focused on how to drive video adoption beyond lecture capture, and improve user engagement with higher-quality content. Presenters from Montana State University shared how they adopted a next-generation video platform, improving student engagement and the user experience while gaining buy-in across campus.

From left to right: Andrew Graf, Chief Product Strategist, TeamDynamix; Bret Ingerman, Vice President for IT, Tallahassee Community College; Kenneth Libutti, CIO, Palm Beach State College.

With complexity in higher ed only increasing—due to trends, including online learning and the demographic shift to nontraditional students—implementing more student-centered services has become crucial to meeting the needs of today’s learners. By creating “One Stop” student services, institutions can modernize, streamline and simplify the student experience while improving efficiency and service.

From left to right: Joseph Clay, VP HCM Transformation, Oracle; Pamela Stroko, VP HCM Transformation, Oracle.

With the landscape of higher ed rapidly changing, it is crucial that institutions can compete for top faculty, staff and leadership, who are not only talented people with the right skills, but are also passionate, engaged and mission-driven.

From left to right: Nicole Engelbert, Vice President, Higher Education Development, Oracle; Steve Hahn, Vice Provost for Enrollment Management, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Tonjia S. Coverdale, Ph.D., Vice President, Information Technology and CIO, Central State University (Ohio).

Students are arriving on campus with a rapidly changing set of goals and expectations. Meeting these expectations while supporting student success across the life cycle requires institutional transformation, bold strategies and innovative use of technology. Cloud-based systems can be essential to the transformation, but utilizing this technology effectively requires a strategic approach.

From left to right: Meghan Turjanica, Product Manager for Student Success, Jenzabar; Mathew Arndt, Lead Data Scientist, Jenzabar; Wade Leuwerke, Associate Professor, Drake University, Co-creator, Jenzabar Student Success Survey.

Many institutions ask their enrollment teams, advising offices, faculty and other departments to focus on student success, but these departments often do not understand all of the unique factors that contribute to the success of their students. A more holistic view is crucial to helping students succeed.

Nudge theory—using subtle reinforcements to positively influence behavior—is increasingly being implemented in higher education, having been proven to increase FAFSA completions, decrease summer melt and improve retention rates. Tiny “nudges” can result in big changes at any institution.

From left to right: Ashok Sankar, Director of Solutions Strategy, Splunk; Kara Gillis, Director of Product Marketing, Splunk.

Higher education institutions are challenged with managing their IT systems as they digitally transform their environments. With new technology trends bucking traditional approaches, research shows a general lack of confidence among IT staff and decision-makers. As budgets tighten and IT is increasingly called upon to modernize institutions, IT practitioners need to look at data-driven decision-making strategies.

Top row, left to right: Tom Gavin Sr., New Business Development, ACI Worldwide; Sandra Jackson, Business Office Manager, Roanoke College (Va.). Bottom row, left to right: Mitzi Steele, Database Director, Roanoke College (Va.); Marc Sczesnak, Director of Product Management, ACI Worldwide.

Technology has not only revolutionized teaching and learning in higher ed, but also how tuition payments are made and campus commerce is conducted. However, today’s payment technologies can be a source of frustration for students and parents. Simplifying the campus commerce experience and improving payment communications are crucial for increasing student and parent satisfaction.

Three months before going live with a new enterprise resource planning (ERP) system—Workday— Indian River State College was missing one important piece: payment processing technology, specifically a cashiering product for in-person payments.

“We would’ve been dead in the water,” says Amanda Bock, bursar. “The payment technology company [we reached out to] wasn’t even communicating with us. We were three months from going live and wondering what we were going to do.”

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