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Beyond the News

CLEAR GOALS FOR A CLEAR PATH—Students accepted to Kansas State U under conditional admissions work closely with academic coaches during freshman year.

Higher ed institutions tap into the trend of offering conditional admissions—opening up possibilities for less prepared students and maintaining enrollment.

EQUATE THIS—A student from Yale School of Management’s Class of 2019 works out an equation during the program’s summer math camp.

Post-grad business schools are identifying opportunities to prep incoming students for the rigorous coursework, particularly as more students are admitted without traditional business backgrounds.

With studies indicating that test success is relative to family income, high school quality and cultural identity, some schools are turning to other methods, including essays and short videos, to select prospective students.

RÉSUMÉ BUILDER—University of Cincinnati student Devon Hensler helped design toys at Fisher-Price. She got hands-on experience with the company as part of a program that prepares fine arts majors for careers.

Co-op programs at higher ed institutions are providing work experience and network-building opportunities to help arts students map out career paths. They’re boosting enrollment, too.

Source: “Decoding the Cost of College: The Case for Transparent Financial Aid Award Letters”; New America and uAspire, June 2018

A recent study of 515 award letters from different institutions finds missing information and wording problems.

Changing legislation is accompanied by growing interest in the convenience of voting on campus.

A ban lifted against Florida campus voting centers allows students, community members and others to mobilize toward the creation of these sites and reflects a push for student voting nationwide.

DISCUSSING COLLEGE COSTS—Moderated by FutureEd Director Thomas Toch (left), the panel discussion included Martha Kanter of the College Promise Campaign; Harry Holzer, former chief economist for the U.S. Department of Labor under President Clinton; Tiffany Jones from Education Trust; and Jen Mishory, author of a book about college promise programs.

Eighteen states and dozens of local jurisdictions and institutions have established “promise programs” to make college free. A panel of educators and economists addressed program success at a recent FutureEd event.

Institutions with the highest mobility rates for low-income students:

HBCUs: 

Alcorn State University (Miss.), Southern University and A&M College (La.), Lincoln University (Pa.), Dillard University (La.) and Alabama State University


Link to main story: Minority-serving higher ed institutions take lead on upward mobility

TECH EFFECT—CUNY Lehman College, a Hispanic-serving institution, recently opened a virtual reality center on its campus in the Bronx to train students for careers in cutting-edge industries.

An American Council on Education report finds that minority-serving schools move low-income students up from the lowest income brackets at two to three times the rates of non-minority-serving institutions. 

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