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From UB

The “nontraditional” student represents perhaps the single biggest growth area for higher ed enrollment. But no single set of characteristics defines that student.

Active members of the military represent their own component of the nontraditional population.

The change of Freshmen enrollment at the University of Missouri from 2015 to 2017. (Source: University of Missouri).

Freshman enrollment at the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri has fallen by more than 35 percent since the institution’s well-publicized and racially driven student protests in November 2015, according to a July New York Times article.

Higher education institutions are placing greater emphasis than ever on the environmental impact of their buildings, with many seeing sustainability as being as demonstrative of their thought leadership as their academic programs. However, few of these institutions are consistent in managing the environmental impacts of their buildings across different phases of the buildings’ life cycles—from construction, through operations to demolition—and the full life-cycle impact of campus buildings is rarely tracked.

With the Trump Administration proposing massive cuts to social programs like food vouchers, children’s health insurance, social disability for the elderly, and temporary assistance for needy families, the Nation faces catastrophic consequences for its social sustainability.

Higher ed institutions—capitalizing on the popularity of the digital pictographs—now offer customized sets of emojis featuring school logos, mascots and other themed graphics, such as smiling or winking faces.

Whether or not you’re one of the 166 million daily Snapchat users, it’s impossible to ignore the deep impact of the mobile app on how teens and young adults communicate.

Sian Beilock, a recipient of the National Academy of Sciences’ 2017 Troland Research Award, is the new president of Barnard College.

Sian Beilock has been named the new president of Barnard College, the women’s institution that’s part of Columbia University.

The 10 higher education institutions with the most credentials on the dark web. (Source: Dark Web ID).

It’s no secret that college and university networks have long been prone to cyberattacks of various kinds.

Universities undergo construction to upgrade their sports arenas and academic facilities.  

DIGITIZE THIS—Students scan Civil War documents at Bowdoin College.

The mass digitization of literature is complex. The preservation of books, letters and other historical materials calls for advanced technology and a good deal of manpower. Universities are developing better practices around this process, as well as creating software and databases to make this content accessible and search-friendly.

It’s not uncommon for officials at institutions, including Lone Star College, to realize the full value of getting technology leaders intimately involved in construction projects right from the get-go after going over budget on a project because IT was brought in too late.

While executing an eight-building, $157 million construction and renovation project in 2014, officials at Del Mar College in Texas forgot one critical player: the tech expert. Information technology administrators weren’t brought on board until just before the design was finalized.

Campuses have already connected a wide array of objects to the digital world,  including parking meters, washing machines and library stands that show where books are located.

The internet of things technology has the potential to change the way buildings are designed and constructed. For colleges and universities, that could mean enabling people to control the temperature at their individual workstations or light a path in a hallway from a smartphone.

MAY THE FORCE BE WITH THEM—Graduates of USC’s Neighborhood Academic Initiative—a rigorous college-prep program for students from low-income communities near campus—got a ceremonial visit from actor Mark Hamill,  of Luke Skywalker and Star Wars fame, and some of his fictional antagonists.

A small change in admissions at many of the most selective colleges and universities could make a big difference to low-income learners. 

Health insurance is a hot topic in Congress, and that’s not the only place. Each year, campus leaders are confronted by a daunting need to contain costs while providing benefits expected by employees.

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