You are here

From UB

What are the biggest roadblocks institutions face when it comes to adding/enhancing mobile donation options?

“Nothing is more frustrating than getting to the end of a payment process only to have it fail. This experience could cause a donor to give up and schools to lose valuable dollars. Advancement offices need a secure and reliable platform that allows them to raise funds anywhere, anytime, via any channel.”

—Heather Richmond, senior director of product management and marketing, TouchNet

It’s extremely challenging and costly to build an in-house mobile donation platform, not only because of the technology, but also because of privacy and compliance issues.

That’s why most universities choose to work with providers that have it all figured out, says Caryn Stein, vice president of  marketing at higher ed consulting firm Ruffalo Noel Levitz.

When vetting a vendor, keep these questions in mind:

Most institutions have barely scratched the surface of the latest innovations in mobile fundraising. Here are key actions recommended by those who are making headway.

Source: “College Completion Through a Latino Lens”; Excelencia in Education, 2018

Latino students complete degrees at lower rates than other ethnic groups—and are more likely to still be enrolled after six years. Higher ed institutions are developing supports as a result.

Elaine Maimon is president of Governors State University and author of "Leading Academic Change: Vision, Strategy, Transformation."  Maimon also co-founded the “Writing Across the Curriculum” movement.

In Leading Academic Change, Governors State University President Elaine Maimon discusses the challenge of turning the two-year school into a four-year, full-service, regional public university.

Led by admissions offices, higher ed institutions are enticing accepted students to officially enroll by using innovative communication approaches, developing peer connections and making students feel as if they are already part of the family.

Aim: To boost enrollment of the top 1 percent of high school students who qualify for Oregon State’s Presidential Scholarship, admissions officers treat academic standouts like blue-chip athletes.

The program began three years ago.


Link to main story: Colleges should always woo would-be students


In the box

At the Hyatt Regency Cambridge, along the scenic Charles River overlooking Boston, a few dozen college presidents and provosts gathered in early May for a day focused on achieving campus harmony. Called the Campus Climate Summit: Getting from Contention to Consensus, the event was sponsored by Thoughtexchange, a provider of stakeholder engagement solutions for leaders of colleges and other organizations.

In a higher education landscape marked by a shrinking student population and increasing uncertainty, institutional longevity—if not short-term survival—is top of mind for most. What many at-risk institutions fail to see, however, is that a primary focus on competition is a precarious survival strategy that more often than not, backfires. Cooperation, not competition is the way out.

University and college professors face new and exciting challenges today due to technological advances in smartphones and smartwatches and the implanted devices that are currently being tested. Students’ growing dependence on smartphones does not stop at the classroom door. Some students use these hand-held computers during class time to listen to music, check the time, text others, surf the web, visit social sites (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, etc.), shop, watch television, view movies, search for information during examinations, answer phone calls, and so forth.

Institutional resiliency is a daunting challenge for smaller, tuition-dependent, change-resistant institutions. Indeed, the most vulnerable of these fragile colleges and universities may soon face extinction.

Astrid Tuminez will become president of Utah Valley University, effective this fall.

Astrid Tuminez will leave Microsoft to hold her first executive-level higher ed leadership position when she becomes president of Utah Valley University, effective this fall.

At Boise State University's Micron Center for Materials Research, students and faculty will have access to 40 research laboratories and other spaces.

ENERGETIC ALLIES—Hampshire College, which operates a solar farm on its Massachusetts campus (above), has joined a coalition of four other small colleges to buy power from a new solar farm in Maine.

Five New England colleges have teamed up in a unique partnership, choosing a site in Farmington, Maine, for a solar-power farm that will reduce carbon footprints on each campus and show students sustainability in action.

Source: Alcohol and Other Drug Use at UMass Amherst Survey, 2012

Continued binge drinking and destructive student behavior have driven higher ed leaders to refine off-campus behavior policies.

Pages