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What’s the biggest misconception administrators outside the facilities department tend to have related to heating and cooling campus buildings?

Stanford’s solar solution: Joe Stagner, executive director of sustainability and energy management at Stanford, has led the university through a solar power-based strategy. By 2030, 75 percent of the university buildings will be powered by solar.

How colleges are getting creative about energy supply to save money on heating and cooling, and to boost building comfort for occupants

Since 2007, U.S. institutions of higher education have primarily reduced carbon emissions by increasing the use of natural gas. (Click graphic to enlarge)

Despite higher ed’s progress in reducing energy use and making facilities more sustainable, it turns out that the biggest factor in the drop has been due to a change from coal and oil to natural gas, a cleaner-burning fuel.

Between 2007 and 2014, emissions per square foot have declined 13 percent, found a recent study of energy use and carbon emissions data at 343 U.S. colleges and universities from Sightlines, a university facilities cost-analysis provider, and the University of New Hampshire Sustainability Institute.

GIS mapping was instrumental in Dickinson College’s cleanup effort after Winter Storm Jonas blanketed the campus with nearly three feet of snow.

GIS maps maps provide details about certain areas of campus—such as the exact length and location of streets and walkways, and the presence of potential hazards. They can also be stocked with limitless tiers of data—for instance, streets on one layer, buildings on a second, student distribution on the next, and high-crime areas on another.

The madness of March swirls around the excitement of collegiate sports. The most successful Division I teams are competing for tournament wins—and the large cash payouts associated with those high-profile victories.

Names like Harvard, Princeton and Stanford are the academic equivalent of Rolex, Tiffany and Mercedes. Other schools have to market themselves. So more of them are advertising these days—but some, paradoxically, seem to do it without much use of what is presumably their stock in trade: expert knowledge.

Fans pack the University of Kentucky arena for every basketball game, keeping ticket revenues high. (Photo: UK Athletics)

As one would expect, successful athletic programs benefit their college or university in a number of ways—particularly in the admissions arena. They raise public awareness of the school, reaching prospective students who may not otherwise have heard of or looked at the university, says Scott Verzyl, associate vice president for enrollment management and dean of undergraduate admissions for the University of South Carolina.

An innovative articulation agreement between Anna Maria College and nearby Quinsigamond Community College (both in Massachusetts) will help fill critical public service jobs.

Under the terms of the agreement, students in public service majors who earn an associate degree at Quinsigamond are guaranteed admission to Anna Maria to complete their four-year degree.

A more centralized approach to course scheduling at Somerset Community College has increased the rates of filled classroom seats and helped students fit in the courses they need to graduate on time. Between 2008 and 2014, the average seat-fill rate has increased by 24 percent and the average student credit load has increased by 48 percent.

Students don’t quite run the show when it comes to course scheduling. But colleges and universities are striving to make it easier for them—with their ongoing juggle of work, family and school commitments.

Survey said: Students at Volunteer State Community College had their scheduling dreams come true when officials changed Monday/Wednesday/Friday courses to Monday/Wednesday, allowing for a four-day week. A survey had been executed to determine why Tuesday/Thursday sessions were filling much more quickly than sessions that met the other three days.

Course scheduling technology providers were asked: What are the biggest hurdles colleges face when trying to implement the scheduling options that students may want?

“Most institutions add new programs and course offerings at a much higher rate than they remove them. This leads to many programs and courses lacking the enrollment required to make them financially sustainable. Different modalities—hybrid, online, accelerated, etc.—can be attractive to certain students, but they add significant complexity to resource scheduling.”

Digital signage has come a long way in the last decade, and is increasingly utilized in higher education. Universities are an ideal place for digital signage, offering a variety of different venues for unique content including dining facilities; faculty and staff offices; faculty, staff, and student lounges; health clinics; gymnasiums or sporting arenas; theaters; classrooms; and student residence halls.

Casper College in Wyoming upgraded its phones by moving from two separate systems to a single VoIP-based one, which makes switchboard operator Cindy Burgess’ job easier.

Providers’ advice on easing the transition to a new IP-based phone system.

The national PhD Project has encouraged about 1,000 professionals of color to leave the corporate world to become business school professors.

Lack of diversity among faculty and administrators compounded the racial tensions that drove a wave of student protests—and a handful of high-level resignations—on campuses across the U.S. in the fall of 2015.

Incoming National University President David W. Andrews was formerly the dean at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Education.

David W. Andrews begins his term as president of National University in California April 1.

Formerly the dean and a professor at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Education, he led that institution to No. 1 U.S. News rankings two years in a row. He promoted “smart growth” strategies in enrollment and program development and raised an average of $10 million per year.

C. Kevin Synott is a professor in the Department of Business Administration at Eastern Connecticut State University.

How many alcoholic drinks do you think the typical female or male college student consumes each week? Clarifying misperceptions may result in fewer alcohol-related problems on our campuses.

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