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From UB

As chief of staff and vice president of strategy for Metropolitan State University of Denver, Catherine B. Lucas redefined the school’s brand in the higher education marketplace, spearheaded the legislative approval process to offer master’s degrees, and led the name-change transition from “college” to “university.”

We are in the business of teaching and learning. So why not expand our learning and explore our mistakes—and the lessons we absorb from them?

Regulatory compliance buckets.

Ignoring compliance isn’t an option. Institutional leaders can take action to ensure they’re on the right track today and to reduce the drain on existing resources.

The emergence of two new degree programs and two graduate certificates shows the complexity of compliance.

In recent years, the rate of hiring of compliance-related administrative officers has exceeded that of faculty, says Steve Hoffman, who consults with colleges on policies and procedures regarding tax issues and concerns.

Widener University in Pennsylvania now offers a master of jurisprudence in higher education compliance through its Delaware Law School.

Mirta Martin will be the next president of Fairmont State University. She was previously president of Fort Hays State University in Kansas.

Mirta Martin has been named president of Fairmont State University in West Virginia.

Wesleyan University (Connecticut), Lakeshore Technical College (Wisconsin) and 21 other institutions have recently licensed Prey Anti-Theft to protect their mobile devices.

As more colleges make dual-enrollment classes available online, new options are emerging for structuring classes, boosting student/teacher interaction and ensuring content rigor. Here are some successful approaches.

A two-story, 19,500-square-foot structure, with an anticipated spring 2019 completion, will serve as a business incubator for technology and engineering startups.

Ronald K. Machtley is president of Bryant University in Rhode Island.

What’s more important in higher education: preparing for a profession or attaining a well-rounded liberal arts education? The answer is that in today’s world both are critical.

Bill Cooper is associate vice president and chief procurement officer for the University  of California system.

In the last six years, higher education funding has continued to diminish. Its primary driver is the continued divestment of state support for higher ed.

What are some ways that you’ve seen student services within residence halls grow to meet student needs and expectations?

“Letter-centric mailrooms are not prepared to handle the packages and the expectation of doorstep-service associated with e-commerce. Students want low-touch retail, and administrators want to offer streamlined, cost-effective and safe services.

Nearly one-third of undergraduates who have declared a major changed that major at least once within three years of initial enrollment, according to a recent study of 25,000 students.

Deciding exactly what to dedicate funding and space to within residence halls can be a challenge. The answers to a few key questions are important to developing effective offerings.

In the case of philanthropy and communications staff, we both desire that our constituencies become enthusiastic supporters and advocates of our institution. It is imperative that these professionals become partners in every sense.  Here’s how.

TEACHER AND LEARNER—A Borough of Manhattan Community College student reads to a child in the college’s Early Childhood Center.

Community colleges are creating developmental tracks, services and on-campus groups to better serve English as second language students and community members.

FOOD RECOVERY HIERARCHY–The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Food Recovery Hierarchy prioritizes actions colleges and universities can take to prevent and divert wasted food. Each tier focuses on different management strategies. The top levels are the best ways to prevent waste because they create the most benefits for the environment, society and the economy. (Source: EPA; UBmag.me/feed).

College students are responsible for about 22 million pounds of the waste, according to the Food Recovery Network, a student-operated movement to fight hunger in the U.S.

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