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From UB

The entire country of England, the city of Seattle and several U.S. campuses have targeted the simple drinking straw as a relatively easy way to operate more sustainably.

Campuses want to tighten security and turn information into action. This has caused an unprecedented surge in demand for safety and data personnel.

Patricia McGuire is president of Trinity Washington University. 

A recent report reveals that as many as 36 percent of students across socio-economic levels experience food insecurity at some point during their college days.

The Executive Level summits during UB Tech 2018 at The Mirage in Las Vegas featured presentations and professional expertise ranging from accommodating new learning technologies to exploring the latest security trends.

Here are some ways to cut through the clutter and close the deal with a certain type of prospective students who are fondly called “stealth” applicants.

Why are kiosks important on campuses and how can colleges better use the technology?

“Making student self-service kiosks available in more campus locations and providing secure, on-demand access to student account information is a recipe for success. Having the ability to utilize these resources 24/7 is a natural fit for students and faculty; and with the right kiosk solution, ID verification, document scanning and form submission capabilities provide instant value and convenience.”

—Margo Bowie, marketing manager, Advanced Kiosks

From wayfinding to making appointments to payment transactions, students and others move through their busy days with the assistance of interactive electronic kiosks.

What should campus administrators consider as they integrate their digital textbooks and e-learning materials with their LMS and SIS systems? 

“Campus administrators need to ensure they understand their student experience goals relating to digital content. The technology ecosystem they use to manage and deliver this experience needs to be considered in full, and in service of their student needs—including privacy, content performance data and individual student data.”

—Ken Chapman, vice president of Market Research, D2L

Integration between digital learning materials and an institution’s learning and administrative systems has gotten better, but instructors, higher ed administrators and providers agree there’s more work to be done.

That work, providers say, is easier when all parties pitch in to figure out how to best serve students.

As more textbooks and other learning materials become digitized, institutions regularly face challenges in smoothly integrating all the different resources into the LMS and other campus networks.

Annual performance reviews are shunned for good reason. Many higher education institutions question the wisdom of this antiquated approach and are exploring alternatives.

What are the biggest roadblocks institutions face when it comes to adding/enhancing mobile donation options?

“Nothing is more frustrating than getting to the end of a payment process only to have it fail. This experience could cause a donor to give up and schools to lose valuable dollars. Advancement offices need a secure and reliable platform that allows them to raise funds anywhere, anytime, via any channel.”

—Heather Richmond, senior director of product management and marketing, TouchNet

It’s extremely challenging and costly to build an in-house mobile donation platform, not only because of the technology, but also because of privacy and compliance issues.

That’s why most universities choose to work with providers that have it all figured out, says Caryn Stein, vice president of  marketing at higher ed consulting firm Ruffalo Noel Levitz.

When vetting a vendor, keep these questions in mind:

Most institutions have barely scratched the surface of the latest innovations in mobile fundraising. Here are key actions recommended by those who are making headway.

Source: “College Completion Through a Latino Lens”; Excelencia in Education, 2018

Latino students complete degrees at lower rates than other ethnic groups—and are more likely to still be enrolled after six years. Higher ed institutions are developing supports as a result.

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