You are here

Articles: Online learning

As more colleges make dual-enrollment classes available online, new options are emerging for structuring classes, boosting student/teacher interaction and ensuring content rigor. Here are some successful approaches.

BUSINESS CASE—Part-time MBA students at Fox School of Business at Temple University can divide their time between classrooms and synchronous web sessions. (Temple University Photography).

With the number of traditional MBA students dropping, business schools must get creative to survive and ultimately thrive.

At Temple University’s Fox School of Business, students have a menu of options to choose their own MBA path.

“They can do 100 percent online, 100 percent face-to-face, or any mix of online, hybrid, and face-to-face coursework,” says Darin Kapanjie, academic director of Fox’s online and part-time MBA programs.

Students can change course on their choices after beginning the program, too. If a student needs to travel or relocate for work, for example, it’s not necessary to leave the program.

An the last few years, a handful of higher ed institutions have offered multisession “pop-up courses” that faculty can design quickly for students who want to earn credit for studying events in real time.

Charles Isbell, the senior associate dean for Georgia Tech’s College of Computing, will be a UBTech keynote speaker in Las Vegas this June.

Charles Isbell’s research passion is artificial intelligence, or AI. The senior associate dean for Georgia Tech’s College of Computing focuses on building “autonomous agents.”

Over 100 schools have joined Great Lakes Educational Loan Services’ ScholarNet for Private Loans network this past year to connect with lenders.

Kelly Cannon is the outreach and scholarly communication librarian at Muhlenberg College.

In the fall of 2015, Muhlenberg College President John Williams asked if I would teach a copyright law course to interested undergraduate students.

When listening to Gary Kayye talk, it’s hard not to feel his enthusiasm for new technologies and how they will impact the next generation of learners.

An increase in technology spending is the gift that about 4 in 10 campus technology administrators are unwrapping to start the new year. Sixteen percent of the 96 respondents to a UB survey, however, must deal with a decrease in spending.

As colleges and universities find new ways to partner with each other to improve services and reduce costs, the idea of sharing an LMS is starting to gain traction.

Gather stakeholders—including faculty, students, IT leaders and others—for honest discussion. 

In California, it was crucial to include student representation in the statewide committee that examined various LMS candidates, says Jory Hadsell, executive director of California Community Colleges’ Online Education Initiative.

That positive approach allowed college constituency groups to focus on the end goal of student learning.  

In what ways could sharing an LMS benefit colleges, and what do you see as the biggest or most surprising challenge institutions would need to overcome to purchase the same LMS? 

“Sharing an LMS across institutions provides many benefits, including consolidation through one system, categorizing content and cross-collaboration. One of the challenges of sharing an LMS is agreeing on a design model that satisfies the lowest common denominator.

There are efforts underway to position colleges and universities to recognize “prior learning” in ways that go beyond today’s standard approaches.

DIGITAL TRAINING GROUND—Institutions increasingly use mixed-reality platforms with virtual students to give pre-service teachers an opportunity to hone their instructional skills.

The University of Wyoming now uses an augmented reality platform with a simulated class as part of its teacher education program.

Martin Pritikin is the dean of Concord Law School at Kaplan University, the nation’s first fully online law school. He can be reached at martin.pritikin@kaplan.edu.

The high cost of legal education drives up the cost of legal services, and both law schools and law firms are typically concentrated in pricier metropolitan areas. Fortunately, readily available technology can address both problems.

Pages