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Articles: International

Academics

The mantra of “if you build it, they will come” has a bit of truth when recruiting international students to community colleges.

“The most fundamental thing that we do is make sure we’re providing quality programs, because the best way to attract new students is through word of mouth,” says Denise Kinsella, interim dean of the International Education Center at Santa Monica College in California.

Before an international student can receive an F-1 visa to study in the United States, the student must apply to the U.S. consulate in their home country with an I-20 Certificate of Eligibility.

It is the higher education institution’s responsibility to ensure that accepted international students have all of the necessary admission requirements prior to the designated school official issuing the I-20 certificate.

Each country has different lengths of time in which students wait for a visa to come to the United States.

What do you see as the biggest barrier to community colleges enrolling more international students?

“Community colleges need to focus not just on recruiting international students but retaining the ones already enrolled. Understanding who these students are and proactively engaging with them creates a stronger reputation and will ultimately attract more international students to that community college.”

—Peter Bruynzeel, vice president, Millennium Software Solutions

Here are five actions two-year institutions can take to recruit international students.

Jack Buckley of the American Institutes for Research edited Measuring Success: Testing, Grades, and the Future of College Admissions (2018, Johns Hopkins).

Measuring Success: Testing, Grades, and the Future of College Admissions (2018, Johns Hopkins) investigates the implications of admissions testing with experts from both sides of the debate.

As global collaboration increases in higher education, so do concerns about violence abroad.

U.S. organizations, including colleges and universities, could receive fines totaling up to $25 million each or 4 percent of annual revenue for failing to comply with a new European Union regulation that goes into effect May 25

In an effort to comply with the impending regulations, Indiana University Bloomington appointed a lawyer to work with various departments that the regulations will most likely affect, including registrars, admissions, HR, facilities and its international office. The university's legal council asked registrars, for instance, to come up with scenarios.

Jonathan Green is president of Susquehanna University in Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania.

The expansion of international education that has been a critical financial stimulus for American colleges and universities has experienced an alarming setback.

Source: Center for Collegiate Mental Health 2017 Annual Report, tiny.cc/CCMH

For the seventh straight year, the rate of students reporting they may harm themselves—and, in turn, who seek counseling—grew, according to a new report

David Steele-Figueredo is president of Woodbury University in California.

While gender and ethnic diversity has evolved from a business imperative to a moral and social imperative, today’s higher education system has been comparatively slow to emphasize the importance of a diverse, multicultural experience.

TEACHER AND LEARNER—A Borough of Manhattan Community College student reads to a child in the college’s Early Childhood Center.

Community colleges are creating developmental tracks, services and on-campus groups to better serve English as second language students and community members.

An the last few years, a handful of higher ed institutions have offered multisession “pop-up courses” that faculty can design quickly for students who want to earn credit for studying events in real time.

Here, we reflect on the major events in 2017 that will continue to shape the higher ed landscape in 2018 and beyond.

GLOBAL LINKS—Arizona State’s Career and Professional Development Services office organized a virtual career fair to connect students with international employers offering internships and career opportunities abroad.

A recent survey by World Education Services (WES) found that more than 40 percent of current international students had not yet used campus career services.

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