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Articles: Student Success

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT—At  The University of Arizona, academic advisors know that every student matters when it comes to retention, not just because each individual’s success is important but also because they realize that retaining just a few extra students raises overall retention rates.

There’s no doubt that higher ed institutions have access to tons of student data these days, but what separates actionable insights from analytics overload?

James Muyskens is a professor at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and former president of CUNY Queens College.

The weakest link in the expanding instructional continuum—where we are least successful—is in general education and freshman introductory courses.

What is the biggest roadblock to effective use of data analytics tools as they relate to student success?

Rahul Choudaha is a higher ed consultant and CEO of DrEducation.

The current anti-immigrant rhetoric in the U.S. has collided with the economic challenges of source countries, creating a perfect storm for international student enrollment.

Daniel Karpowitz, the director of policy and national programs of Bard College’s Prison Initiative, wrote College in Prison: Reading in an Age of Mass Incarceration, which examines the success—and struggles—of a partnership between a private New York college and the modern penitentiary system.

Bard College’s Prison Initiative, also known as BPI, focuses on the importance of the liberal arts in public life.

Got strong graduation rates? Retention numbers? Post-graduation salaries? Then budget time may come with a big bonus. More states now distribute larger portions of higher ed funding to public institutions based on outcomes such as these

BACK A BOILER—Purdue's self-funded ISA program has served 160 juniors and seniors since its launch in fall 2016 and will include sophomores as of next school year. Students with any major may participate in the program, launched as part of a broader effort to make college affordable.

The ISA concept, which many describe as selling stock in yourself, is now an emerging hot topic within the higher ed financing debate.

Today, with increased attention on student success and the long-term effects of unpaid accounts, institutions need to recognize the impact financial services staff have on recruitment and retention. It’s a shift to thinking more about the big picture.

Elizabeth Davis is higher ed president of Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina.

The rancorous 2016 election and this year’s transition to a new presidential administration makes one thing clear: We are suffering from a national shortage of empathy.

MOBILE MINDFULNESS—UT Austin higher ed students and faculty using  Thrive at UT can take a few minutes to read daily and weekly gratitude reflections. Interactive quizzes help students apply the concepts to their own lives.

A well-being app encourages students at The University of Texas at Austin to stay in the moment—via the device that often takes them out of it: their phone.

First-year college students with executive function (EF) difficulties arrive on campus and can be overwhelmed by the independence.

Disabilities services administrators at Greenfield Community College in Massachusetts, University of Connecticut and Landmark College in Vermont recommend the following assistive technology for students with executive dysfunction:

In uncertain political times, some higher ed lobbyists say their most important role may be blocking legislation that could harm their client colleges and universities. 

The STEM workforce was about 8.6 million in 2015, and is projected to grow to more than 9 million by 2022, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Many second-year-experience programs work with only a few thousand dollars in their coffers. Leaders of these initiatives forge partnerships with other departments to curb spending and help students pick majors, choose the right study abroad program or connect with faculty through advising and social events.

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