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Articles: Student Success

MOBILE MINDFULNESS—UT Austin higher ed students and faculty using  Thrive at UT can take a few minutes to read daily and weekly gratitude reflections. Interactive quizzes help students apply the concepts to their own lives.

A well-being app encourages students at The University of Texas at Austin to stay in the moment—via the device that often takes them out of it: their phone.

First-year college students with executive function (EF) difficulties arrive on campus and can be overwhelmed by the independence.

Disabilities services administrators at Greenfield Community College in Massachusetts, University of Connecticut and Landmark College in Vermont recommend the following assistive technology for students with executive dysfunction:

In uncertain political times, some higher ed lobbyists say their most important role may be blocking legislation that could harm their client colleges and universities. 

The STEM workforce was about 8.6 million in 2015, and is projected to grow to more than 9 million by 2022, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Many second-year-experience programs work with only a few thousand dollars in their coffers. Leaders of these initiatives forge partnerships with other departments to curb spending and help students pick majors, choose the right study abroad program or connect with faculty through advising and social events.

Researchers believe more universities need to join the growing number of schools focusing resources on sophomores.

Traditionally, student success programs have focused primarily on transitioning first-year students from home to college. But now more higher ed leaders are realizing that to retain students and help them make informed decisions, they must expand these efforts to sophomores.

MAKING A STATEMENT—Adams State University President Beverlee J. McClure (left) and Vice President Chris Gilmer display the “Declaration of Rights of Historically Underserved Students” at their higher ed institution.

A newly formed academic center at Adams State University in Colorado aims to improve historically underserved and first-generation students’ chances of enrolling in and graduating from college.

In 13 Midwestern states, veterans can now receive college credit for military vocational skills and trades learned working on base or in the field.

NEW OPPORTUNITIES—Current and former inmates of the Fishkill Correctional Facility north of New York City graduate in 2015 from a Nyack College program that has a 100 percent success rate in keeping its students from being sent back to prison. (Babita Patel)

In a recent off-Broadway production of West Side Story, directed by the provost of Nyack College, located north of New York City, the student who played Officer Krupke had once been arrested for impersonating a police officer.

Paul Drayton, president of Rowan College at Burlington County in New Jersey, says higher education remains far too expensive for many students who are most dependent on it for career success.

“College is more important than ever for career success, yet too expensive for far too many students. 3+1 provides all the benefits of both community colleges and four-year universities while lowering the tuition and debt burden on students and increasing our capacity to serve more students at both community colleges and universities. This is the future model of college affordability.”

Outlook 2017 is UB’s third annual special issue aimed at providing insight on the major trends expected to impact campus leaders in the year to come.

Ensuring students are prepared for college and then do well academically, emotionally, physically and financially are key goals of student success initiatives on campuses today. Top institutional officials have student success on their minds—most of them even more so than in 2016, according to a UB survey that includes responses from 66 presidents, chancellors and provosts. 

COLLEGE SERVICES--Susan Brennan is associate vice president of University Career Services at Bentley University. Kara J. Della Croce is director of campus recruiting at Ernst & Young LLP.

Colleges and universities must face a harsh reality: Employer expectations of their graduates are changing. It’s not enough for candidates to have the professional or technical skills needed for a particular job. Hiring managers now want employees with the ability to apply both hard and soft skills to their role.

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