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Articles: Student Success

How is higher ed performing with the “intrusive” approach to academic advising?

“Most schools that we have consulted with are still taking a reactive approach to working with struggling students and are waiting until academic performance or engagement suffers. The most successful schools are implementing a proactive approach and engaging pre-start to guide students through the process, and then engaging periodically throughout their attendance to identify challenges before they affect student performance.”

When we think of “media,” images of the press spring to mind. Instances of “fake news” wreaked havoc throughout the 2016 presidential election, and subsequent accusations of the same levied against news organizations from top officials have dominated news narratives ever since.

My primary goal as a journalism professor is to encourage students to be “media literate.” But as a professional communicator, I understand media literacy doesn’t end with being able to decipher whether a news story is true or false.

Institutions with the highest mobility rates for low-income students:

HBCUs: 

Alcorn State University (Miss.), Southern University and A&M College (La.), Lincoln University (Pa.), Dillard University (La.) and Alabama State University


Link to main story: Minority-serving higher ed institutions take lead on upward mobility

TECH EFFECT—CUNY Lehman College, a Hispanic-serving institution, recently opened a virtual reality center on its campus in the Bronx to train students for careers in cutting-edge industries.

An American Council on Education report finds that minority-serving schools move low-income students up from the lowest income brackets at two to three times the rates of non-minority-serving institutions. 

Many online students still have on-campus business, such as meeting with instructors and making payments, according to “Online College Students: Comprehensive Data on Demands and Preferences,” The Learning House Inc. (UBmag.me/demands).

Like their peers on campus, students enrolled in online programs benefit when they feel included in a community. Colleges cater to this population by offering in-person special events and extended office hours.

Americans learned from the timeless wisdom of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: “Education must enable one to sift and weigh evidence, to discern the true from the false, the real from the unreal, and the facts from fiction.”

One of the great challenges of Community, Technical, and County Colleges is to provide quality, affordable higher learning to the broadest possible audience – a complex mission given the socioeconomic, educational, and health disparities that frequently find expression in the rise and fall of the Nation’s Post-Industrial Cities.

Here are nine places to foster ties among faculty and students.

 Michael A. Cioce is president of Rowan College at Burlington County.

We have actually reduced costs for students with a path to a bachelor’s degree that costs about $25,000—less than what most universities charge for a single year.

It has become increasingly difficult for educators and policymakers to get a firm grasp on exactly how many students persist in their education goals because over half of bachelor’s degree recipients attend more than one post-secondary institution, and two-thirds of community college students are enrolled part-time. (Gettyimages.com: drogetnev).

It has become increasingly difficult for educators and policymakers to get a firm grasp on exactly how many students persist in their education goals.

Marion Technical College’s Buy-One, Get-One tuition model will fund all sophomore-year tuition costs for students working toward an associate’s degree.

Campuses want to tighten security and turn information into action. This has caused an unprecedented surge in demand for safety and data personnel.

Source: “College Completion Through a Latino Lens”; Excelencia in Education, 2018

Latino students complete degrees at lower rates than other ethnic groups—and are more likely to still be enrolled after six years. Higher ed institutions are developing supports as a result.

Elaine Maimon is president of Governors State University and author of "Leading Academic Change: Vision, Strategy, Transformation."  Maimon also co-founded the “Writing Across the Curriculum” movement.

In Leading Academic Change, Governors State University President Elaine Maimon discusses the challenge of turning the two-year school into a four-year, full-service, regional public university.

The growing interest in artificial intelligence may hold the key to a more personalized learning experience.

A culturally rich, historically black neighborhood in Pensacola, Florida, has been experiencing gentrification.

To keep the legacy of the Belmont-DeVilliers community alive, a local engineer is guiding a group of University of West Florida undergraduates creating a virtual version of the neighborhood—along with a small brick-and-mortar museum to showcase the project. 

It’s just one of many such opportunities at West Florida.

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