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Articles: Student Success

The velocity of fundamental change in the world has increased dramatically. Not too many years ago, there was no such thing as social media. But the ascendency of interactive digital platforms fundamentally changed the way we communicate not only in society, but in business. We no longer broadcast to and talk at our audiences; we niche-cast and engage with them. Students who graduated from business school prior to 2008 had no idea that the development of platforms like Twitter and Facebook would become integral to communications with their stakeholders.

VIEWS YOU CAN USE—A teacher wearing smart glasses (right) can see student information projected in an augmented reality platform (left) developed by Carnegie Mellon University. The hovering icons indicate how students are faring on online assignments and if they need help.

When edtech developers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania asked K12 teachers to wish for a superpower, the teachers imagined student data hovering in midair. Smart glasses can now provide that feedback. 

CLEAR GOALS FOR A CLEAR PATH—Students accepted to Kansas State U under conditional admissions work closely with academic coaches during freshman year.

Higher ed institutions tap into the trend of offering conditional admissions—opening up possibilities for less prepared students and maintaining enrollment.

Artificial intelligence—led by text-based chatbots—has infiltrated campus life, helping institutions improve communication, compliance and retention. Here’s insight into launching the technology.

Banking executives discuss how higher ed institutions are doing in their efforts to teach students to be responsible about their finances while in school and in future stages of life.

Chancellor Dan Arvizu and President John Floros began their new roles at New Mexico State University in August, a move that marks the creation of the two positions to replace one.

Due to declining public funding for university institutions and the changing student population, Dan Arvizu and John Floros take the place of Chancellor and President Garrey Carruthers.

RÉSUMÉ BUILDER—University of Cincinnati student Devon Hensler helped design toys at Fisher-Price. She got hands-on experience with the company as part of a program that prepares fine arts majors for careers.

Co-op programs at higher ed institutions are providing work experience and network-building opportunities to help arts students map out career paths. They’re boosting enrollment, too.

When the strategy is that staff reach out to students rather than wait for students to come to them, some colleges experience higher retention rates, which, in turn, helps the bottom line.

NACADA: The Global Community for Academic Advising, a 12,000-member association based at Kansas State University, has many resources on intrusive advising and related topics.

How is higher ed performing with the “intrusive” approach to academic advising?

“Most schools that we have consulted with are still taking a reactive approach to working with struggling students and are waiting until academic performance or engagement suffers. The most successful schools are implementing a proactive approach and engaging pre-start to guide students through the process, and then engaging periodically throughout their attendance to identify challenges before they affect student performance.”

When we think of “media,” images of the press spring to mind. Instances of “fake news” wreaked havoc throughout the 2016 presidential election, and subsequent accusations of the same levied against news organizations from top officials have dominated news narratives ever since.

My primary goal as a journalism professor is to encourage students to be “media literate.” But as a professional communicator, I understand media literacy doesn’t end with being able to decipher whether a news story is true or false.

Institutions with the highest mobility rates for low-income students:

HBCUs: 

Alcorn State University (Miss.), Southern University and A&M College (La.), Lincoln University (Pa.), Dillard University (La.) and Alabama State University


Link to main story: Minority-serving higher ed institutions take lead on upward mobility

TECH EFFECT—CUNY Lehman College, a Hispanic-serving institution, recently opened a virtual reality center on its campus in the Bronx to train students for careers in cutting-edge industries.

An American Council on Education report finds that minority-serving schools move low-income students up from the lowest income brackets at two to three times the rates of non-minority-serving institutions. 

Many online students still have on-campus business, such as meeting with instructors and making payments, according to “Online College Students: Comprehensive Data on Demands and Preferences,” The Learning House Inc. (UBmag.me/demands).

Like their peers on campus, students enrolled in online programs benefit when they feel included in a community. Colleges cater to this population by offering in-person special events and extended office hours.

Americans learned from the timeless wisdom of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: “Education must enable one to sift and weigh evidence, to discern the true from the false, the real from the unreal, and the facts from fiction.”

One of the great challenges of Community, Technical, and County Colleges is to provide quality, affordable higher learning to the broadest possible audience – a complex mission given the socioeconomic, educational, and health disparities that frequently find expression in the rise and fall of the Nation’s Post-Industrial Cities.

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