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Articles: Mobile

BLUE LIGHT BEACON—Kansas State University Police monitor phone call boxes located throughout the campus.  Besides seeking help in an emergency or reporting other incidents, the community is also encouraged the use the boxes for wayfinding assistance. (Cindy Hollingsworth).

Mobile apps, text alerts, personal panic buttons and other new technologies give students more ways to communicate safety concerns.

The growing interest in artificial intelligence may hold the key to a more personalized learning experience.

Marc C. Whitt is director of philanthropy communications at University of Kentucky Philanthropy. Follow him on LinkedIn (linkedin.com/in/marcwhitt) or Twitter (@marcwhitt). 

Just as Amazon and Netflix have personalized the user experience, we too must develop personalized communication and marketing experiences.

Higher education happens to be a leading target for ransomware attacks, in part because of our open approach to the sharing of information and our embrace of different cultures and peoples.

Wesleyan University (Connecticut), Lakeshore Technical College (Wisconsin) and 21 other institutions have recently licensed Prey Anti-Theft to protect their mobile devices.

When listening to Gary Kayye talk, it’s hard not to feel his enthusiasm for new technologies and how they will impact the next generation of learners.

Jack Sharman and Brandon K. Essig are partners in the white collar criminal defense and corporate investigations practice at the law firm Lightfoot, Franklin & White LLC. Clint Speegle is an associate in the firm’s NCAA compliance practice. 

A recent decision by U.S. District Court Judge Philip Simon granted a preliminary injunction in favor of a male University of Notre Dame student.

Now hearing-impaired students can see real-time captioning of spoken events, also referred to as live captioning.

What roadblocks are colleges coming up against in expanding access for hard-of-hearing students during class and at live events?

“While budgets and regulatory awareness can be roadblocks to accessing university classes and events, technology is the greatest challenge to delivering live captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing community.

 Crowd-powered captioning Like with crowdfunding, the future of live captioning may be powered by a group.

With professional captionists costing as much as $100 per hour, a lower-cost solution is in the works to allow groups of average typists to provide real-time captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing. Legion:Scribe is making that happen.

Whether it’s on-site or remote, captions will vary in quality, says Margaret Camp, director of student accessibility services at Clemson University.

Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) is considered the most accurate level of transcription, which is “utterance-for-utterance,” she says.

The captionist types everything heard. However, this level of accuracy costs twice as much as another form of live captioning, called “meaning-for-meaning.”

TEXT WHAT’S NEXT—Georgia State University’s text messaging program boosted enrollment by reminding incoming students of key deadlines and answering their questions.

Colleges and universities should be texting students—but not everyone, not all the time, and not about everything that’s happening on campus.

Carol Patton is a Las Vegas-based writer who specializes in human resources issues.

The University of Santa Monica has implemented an HR information system along with a new management platform called Employee Self-Onboarding by BambooHR.

UNLV students worked with mentors provided by Food & Water Watch’s Take Back the Tap campaign to create a matching fund for station installation. (UNLV).

Hydration stations are popping up at several colleges and universities to promote environmental consciousness and healthfulness on campus.

Marc C. Whitt is director of philanthropy communications at the University of Kentucky Office of Philanthropy. He may be followed on LinkedIn (linkedin.com/in/marcwhitt) or Twitter (@marcwhitt).

In a 2017 study conducted by the Pew Research Center, nearly 7 in 10 Americans reported using social media “to connect with one another, engage with news content, share information and entertain themselves.”

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