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Articles: Operational Efficiencies

Darrin Hartness takes over as Davidson County Community College’s fourth president in January 2019.

Following a career in K12 education leading academic growth and spearheading construction of a new high school, Darrin Hartness will take over as the fourth president of North Carolina’s Davidson County Community College in January 2019.

The 1983 comedy Trading Places starring Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd tells the tale of a slick commodity broker and a homeless hustler whose lives cross when they are compelled to swap socioeconomic roles. In some ways, the story is based on a contemporary version of Mark Twain’s classic The Prince and the Pauper.

As driverless shuttles and ride-sharing become more widespread, consider these five strategies for integrating them with other campus transportation options.

Chancellor Dan Arvizu and President John Floros began their new roles at New Mexico State University in August, a move that marks the creation of the two positions to replace one.

Due to declining public funding for university institutions and the changing student population, Dan Arvizu and John Floros take the place of Chancellor and President Garrey Carruthers.

Scott Cowen, former president of Tulane University in New Orleans, is the author of Winnebagos on Wednesday: How Visionary Leadership Can Transform Higher Education (Princeton University Press, 2018).

In Winnebagos on Wednesday: How Visionary Leadership Can Transform Higher Education, Scott Cowen shows how today’s university is evolving, and how to avoid losing sight of institutional strengths and values.

We hear it all the time—complaints about the inefficiency of public higher education in Massachusetts. These complaints are often based on the incorrect assumption that providing students with a choice—the choice of where, when, and what to study is necessarily inefficient. How do we provide choice in an efficient way? I’ll answer that from my corner of public higher education.  

Richard L. Riccardi is senior associate provost and dean of libraries at Rider University.

In this era of increased accountability, diminishing resources and fierce competition, institutions have begun to see a culture of data-informed decision-making as a necessity instead of a luxury.

Landscaping strives to achieve the following four goals as they prioritize a never-ending list of pressing everyday tasks as well as find time and resources for more intensive projects.

Admissions at the University of Mississippi recently began incorporating language about landscaping services' many accomplishments in mailers to prospective students.

For example, they now mention various awards that the department has earned over the years, such as most beautiful campus by USA Today.

Others include "You had me at Hotty Toddy," an Ole Miss expression that people now relate to the five national championships that the university's landscaping services have won.

Where do campuses fall short on groundskeeping and landscaping, and what misconceptions do administrators outside of facilities departments have about groundskeeping?

As more textbooks and other learning materials become digitized, institutions regularly face challenges in smoothly integrating all the different resources into the LMS and other campus networks.

Astrid Tuminez will become president of Utah Valley University, effective this fall.

Astrid Tuminez will leave Microsoft to hold her first executive-level higher ed leadership position when she becomes president of Utah Valley University, effective this fall.

ENERGETIC ALLIES—Hampshire College, which operates a solar farm on its Massachusetts campus (above), has joined a coalition of four other small colleges to buy power from a new solar farm in Maine.

Five New England colleges have teamed up in a unique partnership, choosing a site in Farmington, Maine, for a solar-power farm that will reduce carbon footprints on each campus and show students sustainability in action.

Developing and maintaining a strong customer service ethos sometimes brings IT managers into unexpected territory. Following are tips on how to handle four such scenarios.

1. Tackle issues head-on and promptly.

This may be especially important for tech staff who ignore policies, fail to carry their load or can’t seem to get along with co-workers.

“Don’t let the bad behavior of a few poison those who want to work,” says CIO Yvette Brown Koottungal at Barry University in Florida. She is also vice president for technology at the university, where she manages a team of 63.

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