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Articles: Operational Efficiencies

As more textbooks and other learning materials become digitized, institutions regularly face challenges in smoothly integrating all the different resources into the LMS and other campus networks.

Astrid Tuminez will become president of Utah Valley University, effective this fall.

Astrid Tuminez will leave Microsoft to hold her first executive-level higher ed leadership position when she becomes president of Utah Valley University, effective this fall.

ENERGETIC ALLIES—Hampshire College, which operates a solar farm on its Massachusetts campus (above), has joined a coalition of four other small colleges to buy power from a new solar farm in Maine.

Five New England colleges have teamed up in a unique partnership, choosing a site in Farmington, Maine, for a solar-power farm that will reduce carbon footprints on each campus and show students sustainability in action.

Developing and maintaining a strong customer service ethos sometimes brings IT managers into unexpected territory. Following are tips on how to handle four such scenarios.

1. Tackle issues head-on and promptly.

This may be especially important for tech staff who ignore policies, fail to carry their load or can’t seem to get along with co-workers.

“Don’t let the bad behavior of a few poison those who want to work,” says CIO Yvette Brown Koottungal at Barry University in Florida. She is also vice president for technology at the university, where she manages a team of 63.

Jo Allen is president of Meredith College.

When it comes to risk management, a key fear is being blindsided by exposure we didn’t even know we had.

Richard Edwards is the mayor of Bowling Green, Ohio, and former public relations executive at Bowling Green State University. Mary Ellen Mazey is president emeritus of Bowling Green State University.

As the newly elected mayor and the newly appointed university president, we recognized that working together on important initiatives would build the university’s and the city’s futures.

U.S. organizations, including colleges and universities, could receive fines totaling up to $25 million each or 4 percent of annual revenue for failing to comply with a new European Union regulation that goes into effect May 25

Quiz: Are data silos a problem on your campus?

Here’s what several higher ed institutions are doing to break down or connect data silos.

Are data silos a big problem in higher ed, and what are the most important reasons for taking them down?

Leading the charge: Office of Institutional Research at Shawnee State University in Ohio

Phase 1 (recently completed)

The three-person office built relationships with the finance office, registrar and admissions office to better understand data concerns and determine where silos could be broken down.


Link to main story: Connecting data silos in higher ed

Leading the charge: 12 representatives from all departments at Baldwin Wallace University in Ohio

Phase 1 (three years ago)

The team began with an “amnesty period” in which members showed each other the data they captured and discussed how it could be shared and used. Progress: “Everyone began to see there were all types of efficiencies that could be created by working together and consolidating reports,” says Greg Flanik, chief information officer.

Philip DiStefano is chancellor of the University of Colorado Boulder and board member of the Association of American Universities.

We are gambling with our nation’s future by pricing its brightest young minds out of higher education. The divestment in public higher education has resulted in infinitely rising tuition and fees far outpacing inflation.

STACKS UPON STACKS—Cornell and Ithaca students not finding what they need in their home campus libraries can now visit the neighboring school for more options.

Sharing resources among campuses makes sense for more than economical reasons, as colleges are finding these opportunities can better serve busy students.

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