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Articles: Technology

A 2013 survey of institutions that have a formal policy covering user-provisioned technologies. (Click to enlarge)

Controlling bandwidth is just one reason why colleges and universities have adopted BYOD policies. Improving computer security, providing reliable internet access for classroom work, and simply letting faculty, staff and students use their favorite devices have driven wider acceptance of BYOD strategies.

The right content, strong wireless infrastructure and extensive faculty training are what Michael Petroski, faculty development coordinator at Lynn University credits with the institution’s 1-to-1 success.

The authors were the founders of Touro University International (TUI), which at first was an online branch of Touro College and later became a separately accredited university by the WASC Senior College and University Commission. TUI remained within the Touro College and University System from 1998 to 2007. It was then sold and became a stand-alone, for-profit university, currently known as Trident University International. During its nine years of operation within the Touro System, TUI generated more than $270 million dollars in net earnings.

While some students in rural communities may have difficulty obtaining access to educational options close to home, students in northern Michigan will have a new opportunity to study CNC programming. This fall North Central Michigan College will implement the “CNC” Digital Fab Lab, a sophisticated mobile educational outreach trailer that gives students hands-on training to attain highly specialized manufacturing jobs.

When it comes to producing college publications, it is important to captivate your audience. There is no better way to communicate with students, staff, faculty, alumni and potential prospects than on the devices they already use. Distributing your college marketing materials, alumni magazines, admissions brochures, university athletics, student portfolios and more through mobile apps is a great idea, but what does it take to create an app that is award-winning status?

Mobile device page views spiked after North Carolina State University launched its redesigned website, which was optimized for mobile.

Colleges and universities miss a significant opportunity to capture the attention of their primary web audience—teens and young adults—when their websites aren’t designed to perform well on mobile devices. While it sounds like a simple concept, making it happen requires resources, a change in mindset and a willingness to experiment.

Carol Patton is a Las Vegas-based writer who specializes in human resources issues.

While some schools operate aging HR systems that can’t perform key tasks, others are looking ahead to their next technology purchase.

Karine Joly says SnapChat may be a useful recruiting tool for colleges and universities.

You’ve tamed Twitter, made inroads with Instagram and finessed Facebook.

Now you can take a break from keeping up with the social networking habits of college students, right?

Think again.

While a few colleges are still trying to grasp the intricacies of the top social platforms, early adopters have been exploring other platforms for communications and marketing.

Among the many hopefuls, SnapChat has started to get real traction on college campuses.

Before switching to a new LMS, campus administrators should determine a learning strategy and the functions needed to support it.

Stable, reliable and adaptable. Those are the key descriptors for a successful learning management system. When the current LMS doesn’t provide a needed functionality, schools can often add new features or configurations to achieve the desired outcome. But in some cases, it’s time to scrap the old system.

Robert E. Johnson is president of Becker College in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Much has been written in recent years about the threats robots pose to jobs in America. Conventional wisdom states that machines will eventually overtake the jobs humans do today and then continue on to the future.  So what does this mean to those of us in higher education who are preparing the future workforce? I contend that despite the projected takeover of robots in all industries, college graduates face a bright future.

Donald Farish, president of Roger Williams University, predicts nonprofit private colleges will continue to increase both tuition and discount rates in 2015. Farish will deliver a keynote at the UBThrive conference in June.

Presidents and other thought leaders look ahead on cost, technology, learning and the other big issues in higher education.

Carol Long is interim president at the State University of New York, Geneseo.

We are facing unaccustomed financial, demographic and competitive pressures, and if we do not address them now, many of us won’t be around in another 40 years.

This does not mean changing our institutional missions. It means learning to adapt and take risks. We ask our students to take risks every day; now it is our turn.

Wi-FI, academic technology and data security will see big investments in 2015. (Click to enlarge graphic)

What cutting-edge devices are going to demand campus bandwidth in the near future? The 21st century versions of two old stand-bys: the refrigerator and the wrist watch. Sure, there will still be plenty of laptops, tablets and smartphones crowding the Wi-Fi, but the “internet of things” and wearable technology are coming to campus, forcing CIOs to yet again boost the power of their networks.

Many institutions expect to make significant investments in academic technology, Wi-Fi connections and network security in 2015.

Of the higher ed leaders who responded to a UB survey, nearly half expect overall tech spending to increase at their schools, while another 40 percent said it will stay the same. Perhaps surprisingly, a full 11 percent expect tech spending to decrease.

#ivorytower—The CNN Films broadcast of "Ivory Tower" on Nov. 20 started a social media frenzy, inspiring more than 12,000 tweets as of mid-December.

When the piece first aired publicly, many viewers live-tweeted—for a total of nearly 9,400 tweets on Nov. 20, according to Topsy, a social web search engine. The film’s central question asks, “Is college worth the cost?”

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