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Articles: Technology

Are data silos a big problem in higher ed, and what are the most important reasons for taking them down?

Leading the charge: Office of Institutional Research at Shawnee State University in Ohio

Phase 1 (recently completed)

The three-person office built relationships with the finance office, registrar and admissions office to better understand data concerns and determine where silos could be broken down.


Link to main story: Connecting data silos in higher ed

Leading the charge: 12 representatives from all departments at Baldwin Wallace University in Ohio

Phase 1 (three years ago)

The team began with an “amnesty period” in which members showed each other the data they captured and discussed how it could be shared and used. Progress: “Everyone began to see there were all types of efficiencies that could be created by working together and consolidating reports,” says Greg Flanik, chief information officer.

The Johnson Cornell Tech MBA is conferred by the Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University, but students don’t do all of their coursework at the Ithaca-based business school.

“Our Tech MBA is very unique in that our students are living and working with students from other [Cornell] programs in what we call ‘studio’ learning,” says Doug Stayman, associate dean at Cornell Tech and associate professor of marketing at the management school.

Higher ed museums continue to evolve, but tried-and-true practices drive current trends such as galleries with moveable walls, event spaces and AV technology.

ATHLETIC INCLUSION—The University of California, Irvine, fields competitive e-sports teams while working to diversify gaming.

Competitive, online video-gaming, also known as e-sports, checks several inclusive and low-cost boxes, and is growing quickly.

Joanne Martin, a member of the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame, will share her perspectives as a keynote speaker in June at the UBTech 2018 conference in Las Vegas.

As the former chief information security officer and vice president for IT risk at IBM, Joanne Martin ensured the firm’s information assets were protected.

Q: What can higher ed institutions do to best protect themselves from technical vulnerabilities that most people would not expect are vulnerabilities (for example, wireless printers)?

“The most important thing organizations can do is ensure they have visibility into every layer of their IT environment—from the network perimeter all the way down to the endpoints. The more an IT team knows about what is connected to the network, the more effectively they can secure it.”

—Joe Aronow, product architect, Cisco Meraki

Quiz: Is your cybersecurity policy effective?

At the Internet of Things Village of the DEF CON security conference in 2016, hacking contests revealed nearly 50 vulnerabilities in 23 devices from 21 manufacturers.

Higher education happens to be a leading target for ransomware attacks, in part because of our open approach to the sharing of information and our embrace of different cultures and peoples.

 Sean Brown helped develop and launch disruptive academic technologies at firms such as Apple, IBM, Oracle and Sonic Foundry.

Today, the use of university-produced academic video brings the promise of redemption and prescient help for students of all stripes through the science of predictive analytics.

As more colleges make dual-enrollment classes available online, new options are emerging for structuring classes, boosting student/teacher interaction and ensuring content rigor. Here are some successful approaches.

Wesleyan University (Connecticut), Lakeshore Technical College (Wisconsin) and 21 other institutions have recently licensed Prey Anti-Theft to protect their mobile devices.

A two-story, 19,500-square-foot structure, with an anticipated spring 2019 completion, will serve as a business incubator for technology and engineering startups.

BUSINESS CASE—Part-time MBA students at Fox School of Business at Temple University can divide their time between classrooms and synchronous web sessions. (Temple University Photography).

With the number of traditional MBA students dropping, business schools must get creative to survive and ultimately thrive.

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