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Articles: Technology

From wayfinding to making appointments to payment transactions, students and others move through their busy days with the assistance of interactive electronic kiosks.

Why are kiosks important on campuses and how can colleges better use the technology?

“Making student self-service kiosks available in more campus locations and providing secure, on-demand access to student account information is a recipe for success. Having the ability to utilize these resources 24/7 is a natural fit for students and faculty; and with the right kiosk solution, ID verification, document scanning and form submission capabilities provide instant value and convenience.”

—Margo Bowie, marketing manager, Advanced Kiosks

Most institutions have barely scratched the surface of the latest innovations in mobile fundraising. Here are key actions recommended by those who are making headway.

It’s extremely challenging and costly to build an in-house mobile donation platform, not only because of the technology, but also because of privacy and compliance issues.

That’s why most universities choose to work with providers that have it all figured out, says Caryn Stein, vice president of  marketing at higher ed consulting firm Ruffalo Noel Levitz.

When vetting a vendor, keep these questions in mind:

University and college professors face new and exciting challenges today due to technological advances in smartphones and smartwatches and the implanted devices that are currently being tested. Students’ growing dependence on smartphones does not stop at the classroom door. Some students use these hand-held computers during class time to listen to music, check the time, text others, surf the web, visit social sites (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, etc.), shop, watch television, view movies, search for information during examinations, answer phone calls, and so forth.

Developing and maintaining a strong customer service ethos sometimes brings IT managers into unexpected territory. Following are tips on how to handle four such scenarios.

1. Tackle issues head-on and promptly.

This may be especially important for tech staff who ignore policies, fail to carry their load or can’t seem to get along with co-workers.

“Don’t let the bad behavior of a few poison those who want to work,” says CIO Yvette Brown Koottungal at Barry University in Florida. She is also vice president for technology at the university, where she manages a team of 63.

BLUE LIGHT BEACON—Kansas State University Police monitor phone call boxes located throughout the campus.  Besides seeking help in an emergency or reporting other incidents, the community is also encouraged the use the boxes for wayfinding assistance. (Cindy Hollingsworth).

Mobile apps, text alerts, personal panic buttons and other new technologies give students more ways to communicate safety concerns.

What role does visible security technology play in deterring campus crime and giving students, prospective students/families, and others peace of mind?

The massive growth of on-campus video is increasing the desire for innovations that naturally leverage the benefits of artificial intelligence.

The growing interest in artificial intelligence may hold the key to a more personalized learning experience.

Meghan Hollowell is dean of College Support Services at The Christ College of Nursing and Health Sciences.

From IT support staff to upper-level administration, everyone wants to protect student data from the hackers who hope to pilfer it.

Question 1: What are the most common misconceptions about teletherapy services for college students?

“With teletherapy still being relatively new to colleges and consumers, there is often the misconception that this is a new type of healthcare service in itself. But teletherapy is just a means of providing therapy as we’ve known it through a medium that creates more access for more students.”

—Cody Semrau, founder and CEO, BetterMynd

Teletherapy has been around for more than two decades and can be delivered through videoconferencing, phone or online messaging.

Alternate terms for teletherapy include telebehavioral health, telepsychiatry, e-behavioral health, telemental health, e-care and telecare.

Multiple peer-reviewed studies, including several meta-analyses, show that teletherapy is as effective as in-person therapy for certain conditions.

A handful of university medical centers around the country offer telemedicine services to the broader community.

Typically, these services are designed to provide options for people who live in remote areas and tend to have less access to health specialists.


Link to main story: TeleHELP in higher ed

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