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Articles: Technology

Binghamton University has extended its reach to the business sector with the Koffman Southern Tier Incubator, a supportive environment for entrepreneurs and startup companies.

Video analytics has been considered the next big thing in campus security. But the surveillance technology, also known as video content analysis, is just beginning to catch the eye of higher ed security administrators.

What is the biggest roadblock to widespread use of video analytics technology?

“ROI. Understanding how to design and implement solutions that work with the analytics system—and not against it—make the difference. Campuses offer a diverse environment with a range of challenges. Proper design and deployment can yield a measurable return on investment.”

—Jammy DeSousa, senior product manager, security products, building technologies and solutions, Johnson Controls

Increasingly sophisticated cameras may enhance security, but they also raise privacy concerns.

Administrators must confront these issues when upgrading surveillance technology and tracking the analytics it generates, advises Larry Consalvos of IXP Corporation, the company that provided software, consulting and project management for Cal State, Northridge’s systems.

Jack Sharman and Brandon K. Essig are partners in the white collar criminal defense and corporate investigations practice at the law firm Lightfoot, Franklin & White LLC. Clint Speegle is an associate in the firm’s NCAA compliance practice. 

A recent decision by U.S. District Court Judge Philip Simon granted a preliminary injunction in favor of a male University of Notre Dame student.

 Crowd-powered captioning Like with crowdfunding, the future of live captioning may be powered by a group.

With professional captionists costing as much as $100 per hour, a lower-cost solution is in the works to allow groups of average typists to provide real-time captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing. Legion:Scribe is making that happen.

Whether it’s on-site or remote, captions will vary in quality, says Margaret Camp, director of student accessibility services at Clemson University.

Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) is considered the most accurate level of transcription, which is “utterance-for-utterance,” she says.

The captionist types everything heard. However, this level of accuracy costs twice as much as another form of live captioning, called “meaning-for-meaning.”

Now hearing-impaired students can see real-time captioning of spoken events, also referred to as live captioning.

What roadblocks are colleges coming up against in expanding access for hard-of-hearing students during class and at live events?

“While budgets and regulatory awareness can be roadblocks to accessing university classes and events, technology is the greatest challenge to delivering live captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing community.

The UBTech 2017 session “Teaching With Glass” offered insights into a powerful yet affordable approach to recording lectures in a natural style.

Curious about the digital habits of college-bound high school students? Since 2005, the E-Expectations report has offered a deep dive into their needs and desires

In the two years since Northern Arizona University launched a virtual 360-degree campus tour, more than 30,000 people have explored the campus virtually.

Why should colleges and universities invest financial resources in augmented and virtual reality?

“Augmented and virtual reality systems can actually reduce the financial burden on university and college programs that require a lot of consumables or expensive hands-on training systems. … I’ve seen a community college reduce the cost of its welding program from $2,800 to $1,800 per student per semester based on material savings alone.”

—Gary Daniels, consultant, Amtek Company

Ronald K. Machtley is president of Bryant University.

At Bryant University, we adopted a six-step design thinking approach that other campus leaders can use to create a culture focused on encouraging innovative teaching and creating innovators.

TEXT WHAT’S NEXT—Georgia State University’s text messaging program boosted enrollment by reminding incoming students of key deadlines and answering their questions.

Colleges and universities should be texting students—but not everyone, not all the time, and not about everything that’s happening on campus.

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