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Articles: Professional Development

Why are metaphors useful? Language is central to our humanity, and the language we use defines how we see ourselves, others and the world. If we see arguments as war we respond very differently than if we see them as dance. Over the centuries, metaphors have been used in daily language and thought (Lakoff and Johnson, 2003) providing us with insights about complex phenomena and defining what we see how we behave, and the cultures we shape.  

What do we know about leaders’ metaphors?

The ongoing wave of school violence has forced higher ed to enhance emergency-response training in teacher education programs.

Adjuncts' short-term, inexpensive contracts, offering no obligation of renewal, provide institutions with much-needed options in managing budgets. But a new wave of activism is challenging the status quo.

As chief of staff and vice president of strategy for Metropolitan State University of Denver, Catherine B. Lucas redefined the school’s brand in the higher education marketplace, spearheaded the legislative approval process to offer master’s degrees, and led the name-change transition from “college” to “university.”

We are in the business of teaching and learning. So why not expand our learning and explore our mistakes—and the lessons we absorb from them?

A new movement that promises closer cooperation between higher ed and K12 aims to end a legacy of passing the buck.

As colleges and universities find new ways to partner with each other to improve services and reduce costs, the idea of sharing an LMS is starting to gain traction.

Attention to underserved students may be well spent on single mothers, a growing demographic on campus.

CREDIT CONVERSATION—Conferences of the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships help ensure dual enrollment students experience a seamless transition into college. (Todd Goodrich).

Colleges and universities in 47 states engage with school district partners to offer dual enrollment programs, in which courses are taught on college campuses, at high schools or online.

Carol Patton is a Las Vegas-based writer who specializes in human resources issues.

The University of Santa Monica has implemented an HR information system along with a new management platform called Employee Self-Onboarding by BambooHR.

Women are underrepresented in technology leadership across all industries, making up just 19 percent of CIOs, according to a 2016 analysis by management consulting firm Korn Ferry.

Kathy Snyder is vice president for human resources at Frostburg State University.

Like most universities—particularly in rural areas—western Maryland’s Frostburg State University has learned to do more with less.

The “nontraditional” student represents perhaps the single biggest growth area for higher ed enrollment. But no single set of characteristics defines that student.

Some higher education institutions have introduced the next generation of mentoring practices to expand development opportunities to more of their employees, integrate the these initiatives into existing programs, and offer reverse and lateral learning across campus.

SCHOLARLY PURSUITS— SUNY Oneonta awards badges to participants in its annual Research and Creativity Day. Each April, students present projects—from research papers to video documentaries—they’ve completed independently and with faculty mentors.

Diplomas—those venerable printed documents that lack hotlinks and interactivity features—have lost some of their luster.

Badges have not just motivated students to take a deeper look at the skills they’ve earned. Several institutions also issue badges for professional development. 

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