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Articles: Security

Joanne Martin, a member of the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame, will share her perspectives as a keynote speaker in June at the UBTech 2018 conference in Las Vegas.

As the former chief information security officer and vice president for IT risk at IBM, Joanne Martin ensured the firm’s information assets were protected.

Q: What can higher ed institutions do to best protect themselves from technical vulnerabilities that most people would not expect are vulnerabilities (for example, wireless printers)?

“The most important thing organizations can do is ensure they have visibility into every layer of their IT environment—from the network perimeter all the way down to the endpoints. The more an IT team knows about what is connected to the network, the more effectively they can secure it.”

—Joe Aronow, product architect, Cisco Meraki

Quiz: Is your cybersecurity policy effective?

At the Internet of Things Village of the DEF CON security conference in 2016, hacking contests revealed nearly 50 vulnerabilities in 23 devices from 21 manufacturers.

Higher education happens to be a leading target for ransomware attacks, in part because of our open approach to the sharing of information and our embrace of different cultures and peoples.

Regulatory compliance buckets.

Ignoring compliance isn’t an option. Institutional leaders can take action to ensure they’re on the right track today and to reduce the drain on existing resources.

Wesleyan University (Connecticut), Lakeshore Technical College (Wisconsin) and 21 other institutions have recently licensed Prey Anti-Theft to protect their mobile devices.

CONSTANT PROGRESS—Congressman John Lewis and author Andrew  Aydin give a civil rights lecture sponsored by The University of Maryland, College Park’s Office of Undergraduate Studies, in conjunction with the William L. Thomas ODK Lecture Series and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

An acute rash of hate crimes on America’s campuses has made it necessary for institutions to refine reporting procedures

Here, we reflect on the major events in 2017 that will continue to shape the higher ed landscape in 2018 and beyond.

Free community college spreads: New York introduced its Excelsior scholarship for students from families with income less than $100,000. The challenges of free tuition also became apparent, as Oregon and other states grappled with fewer budget dollars than needed to accept every applicant.

Higher ed leaders love an opportunity to tout the beauty of their campuses, and continuous construction gives them a lot to talk about.

The majority of college students are not aware of any cybersecurity breaches at their institutions despite most IT departments on campuses reporting such incidents, according to a recent report from CDW-G.

Vanessa Grigoriadis is the author of Blurred Lines: Rethinking Sex, Power and Consent on Campus (2017 Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). She is also a contributing editor at The New York Times Magazine and Vanity Fair.

If there’s one thing clear from Blurred Lines: Rethinking Sex, Power and Consent on Campus, it is that what you think you know about sex on campus is probably wrong.

Following the multiple hurricanes that struck the Gulf Coast this past September, several higher ed institutions used unmanned aerial vehicles or systems—or drones—to assess damage on campuses and beyond.

Robert Shipley is assistant vice president of Facilities Management and campus sustainability coordinator at Adelphi University in Garden City, N.Y.

Storms like Sandy—and more recently Harvey, Irma and Maria—make us think about our responsibility as the people in charge of the facilities that so many live, work and learn in every day.

Value of military equipment  acquired by colleges. (Source: OpenTheBooks.com).

Attorney General Jeff Sessions this summer revived the surplus 1033 program, which the Obama Administration had restricted over public concerns about the militarization of police.

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