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Articles: Tuition

Dual enrollment is designed to increase access and degree attainment. In fact, a 2007 study found that 67 percent of dual-enrollment students enrolled in college after high school (compared to 50 percent of their peers), with 30 percent earning an associate’s degree along with their high school diploma.

Yet students often experience barriers to enrollment.

As the term “free college” draws applicants and ever-more media attention, states, cities and colleges are learning the realities of these large-scale aid programs.

Under Jairy Hunter’s leadership, Charleston Southern changed its name when it achieved university status, dropping the word “Baptist” in 1990.

Sara Goldrick-Rab is a professor at Temple University and author of Paying the Price: College Costs, Financial Aid, and the Betrayal of the American Dream.

In Paying the Price: College Costs, Financial Aid, and the Betrayal of the American Dream, Goldrick-Rab describes what was learned from studying how changes to higher ed financial aid impacts young people and families.

Top topics for a student financial responsibility agreement.

While the concept may seem unnecessary, a formal document—signed by each student—that states tuition payments are, in fact, expected is now required by a majority of colleges.

Active members of the military represent their own component of the nontraditional population.

Connecticut State Colleges & Universities system President Mark Ojakian's strategy of consolidation and shared services, called Students First, should save at least $41 million annually.

Faced once again with state and federal funding cuts, Connecticut State Colleges & Universities system President Mark Ojakian has had to make some tough decisions to keep the 17-school system functioning.

Four-year private institutions continue to rely on—and increase—tuition discounts to attract students, but the strategy is not improving the bottom line.

It’s known that full-time students graduate more quickly and more often than do their part-time counterparts. But what about students who fluctuate between full- and part-time status?

Rahul Choudaha is a higher ed consultant and CEO of DrEducation.

The current anti-immigrant rhetoric in the U.S. has collided with the economic challenges of source countries, creating a perfect storm for international student enrollment.

Roberto A. Santizo is a senior enrollment management consultant with Ruffalo Noel Levitz.

In a survey, nearly two-thirds of private institutions and about half of publics indicated they would attempt to provide financial aid packages earlier than usual.

BACK A BOILER—Purdue's self-funded ISA program has served 160 juniors and seniors since its launch in fall 2016 and will include sophomores as of next school year. Students with any major may participate in the program, launched as part of a broader effort to make college affordable.

The ISA concept, which many describe as selling stock in yourself, is now an emerging hot topic within the higher ed financing debate.

An income-share agreement (ISA) is an alternative to using student loans to finance higher education. Rather than a loan, a student agrees to pay a percentage of their future income for a set number of years back to the investor, which could be a university that funds its own ISA or a pool of investors that has launched an ISA.

ISA provider 13th Avenue, which is currently talking to several institutions about setting up ISA pilot programs, has found that funding is a key challenge. “The schools are interested, but they are reluctant to fund the program so we are busy trying to raise money,” says Casey Jennings, chief operating officer.

ISA provider Vemo Education and the Jain Family Institute, a nonprofit think tank that supports the development of ISAs, are also in the exploratory phase with a handful of higher ed institutions interested in making the investment to launch their own ISAs.

James Martin is a professor of English at Mount Ida College in Massachusetts. James Samels is the CEO and president of The Education Alliance and the founder of Samels & Associates, a law firm concentrating in higher ed law.

In Consolidating Colleges and Merging Universities (2017, Johns Hopkins University Press), James Martin and James Samels bring together higher education leaders to discuss how institutions might cooperate with their competitors to survive.

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