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Articles: Tuition

DISCUSSING COLLEGE COSTS—Moderated by FutureEd Director Thomas Toch (left), the panel discussion included Martha Kanter of the College Promise Campaign; Harry Holzer, former chief economist for the U.S. Department of Labor under President Clinton; Tiffany Jones from Education Trust; and Jen Mishory, author of a book about college promise programs.

Eighteen states and dozens of local jurisdictions and institutions have established “promise programs” to make college free. A panel of educators and economists addressed program success at a recent FutureEd event.

In its report “Navigating The New Normal: Financial Imperatives For MSI Effectiveness and Avoiding Financial Exigency,” the Southern Education Foundation suggests that trustees could better understand their institutions’ financial health with answers to these questions.

1. What is the discount rate for entering freshmen versus for continuing students?

2. What is the blended discount rate?

Following are three key questions campus leaders must consider when offering financial training to the board of trustees.

Marion Technical College’s Buy-One, Get-One tuition model will fund all sophomore-year tuition costs for students working toward an associate’s degree.

Source: “College Completion Through a Latino Lens”; Excelencia in Education, 2018

Latino students complete degrees at lower rates than other ethnic groups—and are more likely to still be enrolled after six years. Higher ed institutions are developing supports as a result.

Taking on more loan debt with age.

Americans age 50 years and older saw their federal student loan debt grow by $18 billion between the second quarter of fiscal year 2017 and the first quarter of 2018.

Providers were asked: How well are colleges using data to measure faculty performance, and what related areas need the most improvements?

“Colleges will typically show the faculty how their scores compare to others at the school, usually those in the same department. But they rarely ask the instructors how they plan to improve any low scores they've earned or coach them how to do so. Closing this feedback loop will improve the students' experience.”

—Howard Walters, SmartEvals.com

Jo Allen is president of Meredith College.

When it comes to risk management, a key fear is being blindsided by exposure we didn’t even know we had.

Measuring faculty effectiveness has never been a perfect science—and it has always held potential for contention among instructors and administrators.

Wendy B. Libby is president of Stetson University.

College tuition has been growing at roughly double the rate of inflation for decades. At last, the trend of annual tuition hikes appears to be cresting.

Students at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center now receive mental health counseling from the office of Student Academic Support Services and Inclusion.

Philip DiStefano is chancellor of the University of Colorado Boulder and board member of the Association of American Universities.

We are gambling with our nation’s future by pricing its brightest young minds out of higher education. The divestment in public higher education has resulted in infinitely rising tuition and fees far outpacing inflation.

A new movement that promises closer cooperation between higher ed and K12 aims to end a legacy of passing the buck.

BEREA, KENTUCKY—President Lyle Roelofs likes to buy running shoes for his students at Berea College—as long as they get some exercise with him twice weekly before class.

Here, we reflect on the major events in 2017 that will continue to shape the higher ed landscape in 2018 and beyond.

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