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Articles: Commerce

How can college retail leaders compete with e-commerce? It’s time to get back to basics. Here are five strategies for staying relevant.

Here’s the rundown for Colgate University, San Diego State University, Clayton State University, Columbus State Community College, Seward County Community College and California State University, Long Beach.

Rogue spending—buying outside a purchasing contract—can be an issue at colleges large and small. Here’s how the small college pros rein it in.

Help spenders put a face to your name. This is easier at smaller colleges, says Karen Khattari, director of general services and procurement at Cedar Crest College. “Everybody knows me, and I know them.” That leads to more control and better accountability.

While many regional consortia use the collective power of members to negotiate purchasing contracts with volume discounts, it can pay to think beyond neighboring colleges when looking at this cost-saving solution.

That’s what the 19 members of the LAMP Consortium did when they joined colleges from around the country to get affordable access to Sakai, a popular open-source learning management system.

What is the biggest key to success with campus store promotions, and what is the biggest challenge in executing them?

REMOTE BUYS—Rural institutions such as Colgate University may have added purchasing woes because of supplier delivery challenges.

These purchasing managers work to save their institutions time and money through a range of strategies that result in purchasing power and wisdom from higher ed peers. Here’s how to do the same.

As textbook sales have declined, campus stores are relying on promotions to attract students who might not otherwise have a reason to visit.

Bill Cooper is associate vice president and chief procurement officer for the University  of California system.

In the last six years, higher education funding has continued to diminish. Its primary driver is the continued divestment of state support for higher ed.

Higher ed institutions in the U.S. lead the world when it comes to producing graduates who go on to create unicorns—private start-up companies worth in excess of $1 billion, such as Uber, Facebook or SpaceX.

Administrators at the University of San Diego have developed an app store featuring apps that go beyond typical functions such as viewing course schedules.

In 2002, the question founder Andrew Lippman at MIT Lab's higher ed Viral Communications Group wanted to explore was if there were ways to make things like networks scalable—where the networks get better as they get bigger—as opposed to getting overloaded.

Andrew Lippman is one of the foremost experts on viral communication and digital life. As a founder of MIT’s Media Lab, Lippman had been studying this field long before many of us ever heard of the internet. 

Robert A. Walton is CEO of the National Association of College Stores.

Campus bookstores at most higher education institutions are asked to increase revenues to support operations, scholarships and other campuswide needs as well as drive down prices and ratchet up services to help students.

After years of working with multiple food service vendors and local restaurants, Carnegie Mellon University brought fast-casual bakery chain Au Bon Pain to campus. The school’s first experience with a national restaurant franchise, it was a 12-month process from the brainstorming phase to opening the doors to hungry students.

Ken Artin, is a public finance lawyer at Bryant Miller Olive. He can be reached at kartin@bmolaw.com.

There is a great need for infrastructure such as classrooms, student housing, dining and wellness facilities. Public-private partnerships (P3s) are a form of contracting between the public sector and private industry that capitalizes on the potential for private investment in a project, while sharing risk between the public and private partners.

Robert A. Walton is CEO of the National Association of College Stores

In the pursuit of streamlined processes and reduced risk, a significant question is often overlooked: Do you want a store that reflects the personality and values of your campus or do you want a cookie-cutter corporate showroom, focused on selling products and making a profit?

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