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Articles: Grants

Thomas J. Botzman, Ph.D., is president of Misericordia University in Dallas, Pa.

Increasingly, higher education is taking a larger role in providing opportunities for our veterans.

Just as students were headed back to campuses in southeastern Texas in late August, Hurricane Harvey struck.

More than 500 colleges and universities provide some type of resource to help students address unexpected financial emergencies, according to a 2016 study by NASPA.

As the term “free college” draws applicants and ever-more media attention, states, cities and colleges are learning the realities of these large-scale aid programs.

LIGHTING THE WAY—Millsaps College holds its “Fourth Night” ceremony for new students. The Mississippi school, along with 10 other U.S. institutions,  has won a grant to create a Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation center.

Students and faculty at 10 colleges and universities will work with surrounding communities to improve race relations, social justice and tolerance.

Reducing student financial aid packages based on scholarship funding from outside sources, a common practice, will no longer happen at public colleges in Maryland.

Sara Goldrick-Rab is a professor at Temple University and author of Paying the Price: College Costs, Financial Aid, and the Betrayal of the American Dream.

In Paying the Price: College Costs, Financial Aid, and the Betrayal of the American Dream, Goldrick-Rab describes what was learned from studying how changes to higher ed financial aid impacts young people and families.

DREAMER PRIDE—A participant certificate awarded for the completion of Sacramento State’s Dreamer Ally training explains the meaning of its hummingbird logo. These birds are known for overcoming challenges, and  the circle represents a reminder that undocumented students are welcome.

With the specter of a federal crackdown on illegal immigration looming, higher ed institutions are finding ways to better serve undocumented students, and also protect their identities.

MAY THE FORCE BE WITH THEM—Graduates of USC’s Neighborhood Academic Initiative—a rigorous college-prep program for students from low-income communities near campus—got a ceremonial visit from actor Mark Hamill,  of Luke Skywalker and Star Wars fame, and some of his fictional antagonists.

A small change in admissions at many of the most selective colleges and universities could make a big difference to low-income learners. 

Clinton T. Speegle is an attorney with the law firm Lightfoot, Franklin & White LLC in Birmingham, Alabama. He can be reached at cspeegle@lightfootlaw.com.

Future use of unmanned aerial systems, more commonly known as “drones,” is limited only by the imagination (and physics).

Four-year private institutions continue to rely on—and increase—tuition discounts to attract students, but the strategy is not improving the bottom line.

Lori E. Varlotta is president of Hiram College in Ohio.

This fall, Hiram College becomes one of just a few universities in the country—and the only four-year college in Ohio—to launch a campuswide mobile technology program.

Sometimes it becomes clear very early on that a facilities project—especially a solar initiative—will be complicated.

J. Nelson Wilkinson is a labor and education law attorney with Williams Mullen who represents small, medium and large businesses and higher ed academic institutions.

A January memorandum issued by Richard Griffin, the current general counsel of the National Labor Relations Board, has further stoked long-running debate over whether university students should be deemed “employees” who can assert collective bargaining rights under the National Labor Relations Act.

Adults need more flexible higher ed programs that allow them to do college coursework remotely and at their own pace and at any time. (GettyImages.com: Kali9)

A newly formed advocacy organization hopes to smooth the process for busy adults looking to attend college.

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