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Articles: Grants

The Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) has launched a new consortium to address the needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

“The company will make an initial investment of $50 million in a new and ongoing education program specifically designed to cover tuition costs for hourly employees—a result of the recently enacted tax reform and representing a total allocation of more than $175 million in this fiscal year.” Continue reading.

TEACHER AND LEARNER—A Borough of Manhattan Community College student reads to a child in the college’s Early Childhood Center.

Community colleges are creating developmental tracks, services and on-campus groups to better serve English as second language students and community members.

A new movement that promises closer cooperation between higher ed and K12 aims to end a legacy of passing the buck.

Bill Berg is an enrollment management consultant at Ruffalo Noel Levitz.

There’s no question that recent graduates are leaving college with more student loan debt. More students are taking out loans and they’re borrowing larger amounts.

Thomas J. Botzman, Ph.D., is president of Misericordia University in Dallas, Pa.

Increasingly, higher education is taking a larger role in providing opportunities for our veterans.

Just as students were headed back to campuses in southeastern Texas in late August, Hurricane Harvey struck.

More than 500 colleges and universities provide some type of resource to help students address unexpected financial emergencies, according to a 2016 study by NASPA.

As the term “free college” draws applicants and ever-more media attention, states, cities and colleges are learning the realities of these large-scale aid programs.

LIGHTING THE WAY—Millsaps College holds its “Fourth Night” ceremony for new students. The Mississippi school, along with 10 other U.S. institutions,  has won a grant to create a Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation center.

Students and faculty at 10 colleges and universities will work with surrounding communities to improve race relations, social justice and tolerance.

Reducing student financial aid packages based on scholarship funding from outside sources, a common practice, will no longer happen at public colleges in Maryland.

Sara Goldrick-Rab is a professor at Temple University and author of Paying the Price: College Costs, Financial Aid, and the Betrayal of the American Dream.

In Paying the Price: College Costs, Financial Aid, and the Betrayal of the American Dream, Goldrick-Rab describes what was learned from studying how changes to higher ed financial aid impacts young people and families.

DREAMER PRIDE—A participant certificate awarded for the completion of Sacramento State’s Dreamer Ally training explains the meaning of its hummingbird logo. These birds are known for overcoming challenges, and  the circle represents a reminder that undocumented students are welcome.

With the specter of a federal crackdown on illegal immigration looming, higher ed institutions are finding ways to better serve undocumented students, and also protect their identities.

MAY THE FORCE BE WITH THEM—Graduates of USC’s Neighborhood Academic Initiative—a rigorous college-prep program for students from low-income communities near campus—got a ceremonial visit from actor Mark Hamill,  of Luke Skywalker and Star Wars fame, and some of his fictional antagonists.

A small change in admissions at many of the most selective colleges and universities could make a big difference to low-income learners. 

Clinton T. Speegle is an attorney with the law firm Lightfoot, Franklin & White LLC in Birmingham, Alabama. He can be reached at cspeegle@lightfootlaw.com.

Future use of unmanned aerial systems, more commonly known as “drones,” is limited only by the imagination (and physics).

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