You are here

Articles: Asset & Investments

Adjuncts' short-term, inexpensive contracts, offering no obligation of renewal, provide institutions with much-needed options in managing budgets. But a new wave of activism is challenging the status quo.

Bill Cooper is associate vice president and chief procurement officer for the University  of California system.

In the last six years, higher education funding has continued to diminish. Its primary driver is the continued divestment of state support for higher ed.

ROOM AND A VIEW—Nestled among the Oakland Hills and overlooking Oakland, San Francisco and the Bay, Holy Names University has 60 wooded acres and space to build on once Samuel Merritt University relocates there.

This fall, Samuel Merritt and Holy Names University signed a non-binding letter of intent to explore the possibilities of sharing a single property.

 Donald Hasseltine, formerly vice president for development at Brown University, is now a senior consultant with the Aspen Leadership Group.

Alumni participation is falling at a precipitous rate, the number of mid-level major gifts are flat, and annual fund support has struggled to keep pace with inflation.

As colleges and universities find new ways to partner with each other to improve services and reduce costs, the idea of sharing an LMS is starting to gain traction.

Gather stakeholders—including faculty, students, IT leaders and others—for honest discussion. 

In California, it was crucial to include student representation in the statewide committee that examined various LMS candidates, says Jory Hadsell, executive director of California Community Colleges’ Online Education Initiative.

That positive approach allowed college constituency groups to focus on the end goal of student learning.  

In what ways could sharing an LMS benefit colleges, and what do you see as the biggest or most surprising challenge institutions would need to overcome to purchase the same LMS? 

“Sharing an LMS across institutions provides many benefits, including consolidation through one system, categorizing content and cross-collaboration. One of the challenges of sharing an LMS is agreeing on a design model that satisfies the lowest common denominator.

Michael S. Zetlin is a founding partner of Zetlin & De Chiara LLP, specializing in construction and contract litigation. Ramsen Youash is an associate with Zetlin & De Chiara’s New York office.

More colleges are turning toward a public-private partnership (P3) model—a practice common in Europe and Australia—to fund new infrastructure or upgrade existing buildings.

The closure of Amazon’s virtual bookseller at UMass Amherst underscores once again the need for campus stores to diversify services.

Following the multiple hurricanes that struck the Gulf Coast this past September, several higher ed institutions used unmanned aerial vehicles or systems—or drones—to assess damage on campuses and beyond.

Martin Pritikin is the dean of Concord Law School at Kaplan University, the nation’s first fully online law school. He can be reached at martin.pritikin@kaplan.edu.

The high cost of legal education drives up the cost of legal services, and both law schools and law firms are typically concentrated in pricier metropolitan areas. Fortunately, readily available technology can address both problems.

Event management systems have given schools greater control over everything from booking spaces to ordering food, linens and equipment.

Montclair State partnered with the Sony Corporation to create what the New Jersey-based institution touts as the most technologically advanced broadcast and media production facility at a university.

Developing a successful model for creating an e-textbook program is key to taking digital course materials to the next step of widespread use. Here are three ways to design an e-textbook initiative.

Here’s what colleges paying attention to the potential of digital signage as a revenue source—directly or indirectly—are doing to make it work.

Pages