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Articles: Sustainability

California State University's Dominguez Hills campus is set to complete a three-story, 91,000-square-foot building for early 2020.

Robert Shipley is assistant vice president of Facilities Management and campus sustainability coordinator at Adelphi University in Garden City, N.Y.

Storms like Sandy—and more recently Harvey, Irma and Maria—make us think about our responsibility as the people in charge of the facilities that so many live, work and learn in every day.

Binghamton University has extended its reach to the business sector with the Koffman Southern Tier Incubator, a supportive environment for entrepreneurs and startup companies.

Their form and function may vary, but there’s one trait nearly every president’s residence has in common: It’s much more than just a home.

Colleges and universities have turned their attention to areas on campuses that generate tremendous amounts of waste in small amounts of time: their stadiums and arenas.

The trend toward greener game days is most pronounced among the big athletic schools, given their more plentiful resources, says Julian Dautremont-Smith, director of programs for the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education.

At the same time, colleges where sports are less prominent can still find ways to integrate sustainability into game days.

It’s really about the same strategies of recycling and composting.

What might an institution do to avoid mistakes in executing game-day waste plans?

“When greening your game day, it’s important to work with stadium vendors to procure materials that you know can be recycled, composted or reused to ensure higher diversion. Education is key, as changing consumer behavior takes time. Be clear and consistent in what you ask fans to do on game day.”

Janette Micelli, manager, external communications, Waste Management

Take a look inside the minds of leaders of campus fleets as they share their major concerns and what they’re doing to keep things moving along.

UNLV students worked with mentors provided by Food & Water Watch’s Take Back the Tap campaign to create a matching fund for station installation. (UNLV).

Hydration stations are popping up at several colleges and universities to promote environmental consciousness and healthfulness on campus.

Higher education institutions are placing greater emphasis than ever on the environmental impact of their buildings, with many seeing sustainability as being as demonstrative of their thought leadership as their academic programs. However, few of these institutions are consistent in managing the environmental impacts of their buildings across different phases of the buildings’ life cycles—from construction, through operations to demolition—and the full life-cycle impact of campus buildings is rarely tracked.

Every school needs a reliable water supply—no matter the climate—yet it is often the most overlooked aspect of facilities management.

Boston University has seven certified restaurants (more than any other college or university) and the GRA has verified the institution has the greenest food court in the nation.

Here are four questions facilities administrators as well as other campus officials should be asking to lower the risk of a hazardous materials tragedy.

Sometimes it becomes clear very early on that a facilities project—especially a solar initiative—will be complicated.

Deciding where to install a solar array is one of the most critical decisions you’ll make.

Respond yes or no to the following questions as a first step in determining which type of installation makes more sense for your campus.

Rooftop installation

Are there obstructions on the roof—such as skylights, HVAC systems or other equipment—that would make it difficult to install solar panels?

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