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Articles: Sustainability

To celebrate its bicentennial in 2018, Bentley University in Waltham, Massachusetts, built a 76,000-square-foot arena that meets the needs of its Division I hockey program while also serving the entire campus community.

Where do campuses fall short on groundskeeping and landscaping, and what misconceptions do administrators outside of facilities departments have about groundskeeping?

The entire country of England, the city of Seattle and several U.S. campuses have targeted the simple drinking straw as a relatively easy way to operate more sustainably.

Landscaping strives to achieve the following four goals as they prioritize a never-ending list of pressing everyday tasks as well as find time and resources for more intensive projects.

ENERGETIC ALLIES—Hampshire College, which operates a solar farm on its Massachusetts campus (above), has joined a coalition of four other small colleges to buy power from a new solar farm in Maine.

Five New England colleges have teamed up in a unique partnership, choosing a site in Farmington, Maine, for a solar-power farm that will reduce carbon footprints on each campus and show students sustainability in action.

Imagine a relay race with no one to hand off the torch?  This is the daunting challenge we face with the future of agricultural education. Nationwide, fewer than one out of ten students are likely to consider agriculture as a career and among agricultural students, one out of ten will actually consider agricultural education as an option.

FOOD RECOVERY HIERARCHY–The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Food Recovery Hierarchy prioritizes actions colleges and universities can take to prevent and divert wasted food. Each tier focuses on different management strategies. The top levels are the best ways to prevent waste because they create the most benefits for the environment, society and the economy. (Source: EPA; UBmag.me/feed).

College students are responsible for about 22 million pounds of the waste, according to the Food Recovery Network, a student-operated movement to fight hunger in the U.S.

California State University's Dominguez Hills campus is set to complete a three-story, 91,000-square-foot building for early 2020.

Robert Shipley is assistant vice president of Facilities Management and campus sustainability coordinator at Adelphi University in Garden City, N.Y.

Storms like Sandy—and more recently Harvey, Irma and Maria—make us think about our responsibility as the people in charge of the facilities that so many live, work and learn in every day.

Binghamton University has extended its reach to the business sector with the Koffman Southern Tier Incubator, a supportive environment for entrepreneurs and startup companies.

Their form and function may vary, but there’s one trait nearly every president’s residence has in common: It’s much more than just a home.

Colleges and universities have turned their attention to areas on campuses that generate tremendous amounts of waste in small amounts of time: their stadiums and arenas.

The trend toward greener game days is most pronounced among the big athletic schools, given their more plentiful resources, says Julian Dautremont-Smith, director of programs for the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education.

At the same time, colleges where sports are less prominent can still find ways to integrate sustainability into game days.

It’s really about the same strategies of recycling and composting.

What might an institution do to avoid mistakes in executing game-day waste plans?

“When greening your game day, it’s important to work with stadium vendors to procure materials that you know can be recycled, composted or reused to ensure higher diversion. Education is key, as changing consumer behavior takes time. Be clear and consistent in what you ask fans to do on game day.”

Janette Micelli, manager, external communications, Waste Management

Take a look inside the minds of leaders of campus fleets as they share their major concerns and what they’re doing to keep things moving along.

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