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Articles: Financial Services

Community colleges in two of California’s biggest cities have announced plans to substantially expand access to public education by offering residents
the chance to earn an associate degree for free.

Higher ed researchers Beth Akers and Matthew Chingos, in their book Game of Loans: The Rhetoric and Reality of Student Debt, say the real challenges facing student lending are obscured by the popular myth of looming crisis.

The student debt crisis—despite dire warnings from the media—is not as bad as it is portrayed, researchers Beth Akers and Matthew Chingos say.

Higher ed institutions in the U.S. lead the world when it comes to producing graduates who go on to create unicorns—private start-up companies worth in excess of $1 billion, such as Uber, Facebook or SpaceX.

Many small towns and rural regions rely on the nation’s 600 rural community and tribal colleges to provide employees who will keep local economies alive.

But these institutions, which also serve as cultural centers, face a range pressures in supporting the day-to-day needs of a dwindling number of high school graduates with less money to spend, says Randy Smith, director of the Rural Community College Alliance.

For instance, Sisseton Wahpeton College in South Dakota—where Smith is president—provides campus shuttle service to students who live as far as 30 miles away.

Ten years ago, few universities employed chief information security officers. Now these administrators—known as CISOs—lead teams dedicated to shielding information, systems and research from internet thieves, and to keeping up with federal regulations.

Administrators at the University of San Diego have developed an app store featuring apps that go beyond typical functions such as viewing course schedules.

Gary A. Olson is president of Daemen College in New York.

Like all of the free tuition plans proposed to date, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s plan in its present form will have unintended consequences that could be devastating to the state’s economy.

Campus discussions about spend analytics might sound like a late night infomercial: Implement the technology and save millions!

14 percent of students started their postsecondary education in a community college, then transferred to a four-year school and earned a bachelor’s degree within six years of entry.

In 2002, the question founder Andrew Lippman at MIT Lab's higher ed Viral Communications Group wanted to explore was if there were ways to make things like networks scalable—where the networks get better as they get bigger—as opposed to getting overloaded.

Andrew Lippman is one of the foremost experts on viral communication and digital life. As a founder of MIT’s Media Lab, Lippman had been studying this field long before many of us ever heard of the internet. 

The STEM workforce was about 8.6 million in 2015, and is projected to grow to more than 9 million by 2022, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

SERVING THE UNDERSERVED—Terrence Murphy Hall (back right) on the downtown Minneapolis campus of the University of St. Thomas will house the two-year Dougherty Family College beginning this fall.

Dougherty Family College, a two-year school, will open on the Minneapolis campus of the University of St. Thomas this fall, thanks to $18 million in private donations.

solidarity—About 300 students participated in an Amherst College protest against President Trump’s proposed policies regarding undocumented immigrants. (Takudzwa Tapfuma for The Amherst Student)

President Donald Trump has made immigration reform a centerpiece of his young administration. New policies include banning travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S., and a plan to deport millions of undocumented immigrants.

Robert A. Walton is CEO of the National Association of College Stores.

Campus bookstores at most higher education institutions are asked to increase revenues to support operations, scholarships and other campuswide needs as well as drive down prices and ratchet up services to help students.

Many second-year-experience programs work with only a few thousand dollars in their coffers. Leaders of these initiatives forge partnerships with other departments to curb spending and help students pick majors, choose the right study abroad program or connect with faculty through advising and social events.

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