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Articles: Leadership

Earlier this year, former College of DuPage President Robert Breuder almost won himself a $763,000 golden parachute to leave the institution in March 2016, three years before his contract expired; that contract has since been voided by the college’s board, and the package reduced to $495,000.

In an apparent response, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner has signed two new laws limiting terms for community college presidents and restricting their severance packages.

Like it or not, we spend a lot of time on planes and in airports as we travel to campuses across the Nation and around the world. Over the 2015 summer session we sensed winds of change in the aeronautics industry – read as, devising new global security measures; retrofitting outdated air fleets; and creating safe and enjoyable air travel experiences.

The skill set required for today’s top jobs in higher education has never been more extensive or demanding. Boards of Trustees are looking for leadership in several areas: academic authority, fundraising ability, public relations and media savvy, legal and political sensitivity, as well as ease of movement between constituent groups—alumni, students, faculty, parents, donors, business leaders, government—all with significant claims on the president’s time and attention.

Several years ago we shared with University Business readership our prognostications on contemporary polytechnic institutions popping up across the U.S. In relatively short time, higher ed is still surfing the Polytechnic Revival wave at engineering schools, colleges, and universities across the Nation.

The common heritage of Classic Polytechnics extends back to the 1745 founding of the Technische Universität Braunschweig in Germany; the establishment in 1794 of the École Polytechnique in France; and the first American polytechnic, Rensselaer, chartered in 1824.

In her keynote speech at UBTech 2015, Worcester Polytechnic Institute President Laurie Leshin said educators must drive innovation—and the economy—by inspiring students to ask tough questions.

The leadership teams of InfoComm International and UBTech/University Business will collaborate on conference programming and promotional initiatives to offer expanded participation opportunities for higher education leaders at the flagship annual conferences of both organizations.

Brian Casey is leaving the presidency at DePauw University to take over at Colgate.

Brian W. Casey, president of DePauw University in Indiana, will become the 17th president of Colgate University in New York.

Casey has led “DePauw 2020,” a multiyear strategic plan. And under his leadership, DePauw has invested in academic programs, campus projects, student advising and postgraduate planning, plus established and secured more than $56 million for The DePauw Trust.

Prior to joining DePauw in 2008, Casey served as associate dean for academic affairs in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard. He is also a former assistant provost at Brown.

ERM policies being executed tend to share one major approach: sharing ownership of various risks campuswide.

With YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and other social media outlets, virtually nothing escapes the public’s notice, and judgment. It’s one reason higher education is paying much more attention to risk management now than in the past.

Effective Sept. 1, James R. Johnsen becomes the 14th president of the University of Alaska System.

Formerly UA’s vice president of administration and chief of staff, Johnsen was most previously the senior vice president of human resources and process transformation at Alaska Communications, a telecommunications corporation based in Anchorage.

Johnsen has committed to travel to all 16 UA campuses during his first year and has said his goals are to expand access and affordability, drive cost effectiveness and promote academic excellence.

New University of Oregon President Michael H. Schill is the former dean and professor at The University of Chicago Law School.

Michael H. Schill took the helm at the University of Oregon on July 1 as its 18th president. He is the former dean and professor at The University of Chicago Law School.

Prior to joining UChicago in 2010, Schill served as dean of UCLA’s School of Law. An expert in property, real estate and housing law and policy, Schill is the author or co-author of three books and more than 40 scholarly articles.

Officials at Antioch College, which was resurrected after being closed several years, expect to have 70 to 75 first-year students in fall 2015. Plans are beginning on a new dorm.

Your school has been rescued—now what? How do you restore students’ and parents’ faith in your revived institution? Institutions like Antioch and Sweet Briar are paving the way.

Rick Cherwitz is a professor in the Moody College of Communication and faculty fellow in the Division of Diversity & Community Engagement at The University of Texas at Austin.

The “faculty contract” is a process by which faculty, in consultation with their departments and colleges, negotiate—and then, over the course of time—renegotiate their work product. This would institute greater flexibility and autonomy in determining the work product of faculty.

Mark B. Rosenberg is president of Florida International University

Universities must blur the lines—between public and private, between not-for-profit and commercial, between the liberal arts and STEM—by working with industry and nonprofit organizations to create unique training, research opportunities and jobs. The world is boundary-less, and our teaching and learning must be as well.

Arizona State President Michael Crow envisions an egalitarian institution committed to academic excellence, inclusiveness to a broad demographic, and maximum societal impact.

Arizona State President Michael Crow is out to reinvent the public research university. Using ASU as the prototype, Crow sees the promise of an egalitarian ‘New American University’ committed to academic excellence, inclusiveness to a broad demographic, and maximum societal impact.

New University of Texas at Austin President Gregory L. Fenves had been provost and executive vice president since 2013.

In June Gregory L. Fenves assumed the role of president of The University of Texas at Austin. He had been provost and executive vice president since 2013.

Fenves oversaw the creation of the Dell Medical School and launched a “Campus Conversation” intended to redefine the residential college experience in the 21st Century by identifying the essential learning elements of a high-quality degree and increasing the role of student discovery and research in undergraduate education.

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