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Articles: Health

Patricia McGuire is president of Trinity Washington University. 

A recent report reveals that as many as 36 percent of students across socio-economic levels experience food insecurity at some point during their college days.

COOKING UP BETTER HEALTH—Med students at The Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane get hands-on culinary lessons to learn how food preparation and diet impact illness. The center was the first dedicated teaching kitchen to be implemented at a medical school.

More than 40 medical schools have added culinary medicine programs to the menu to help students better understand how to combat obesity, diabetes and other chronic diseases.

SAVE A LIFE—Bridgewater State Police Chief David Tillinghast kicked off the university’s Narcan program, which provides training on use of the overdose-reversal drug. It is stored in 50 public places across campus.

Training is underway at colleges and universities to teach more people how to administer the drug that reverses opioid overdoses.

In his trainings with students, faculty and staff, Detective Sgt. Robert McEvoy, of the Bridgewater State University Police in Massachusetts, details the following signs of an opioid overdose.

These signs are:


Link to main story: Colleges train to reverse opioid overdoses


Teletherapy has been around for more than two decades and can be delivered through videoconferencing, phone or online messaging. (Gettyimages.com: sjenner13).

Here’s what campus administrators need to know about virtual behavioral health services and how to implement them.

Question 1: What are the most common misconceptions about teletherapy services for college students?

“With teletherapy still being relatively new to colleges and consumers, there is often the misconception that this is a new type of healthcare service in itself. But teletherapy is just a means of providing therapy as we’ve known it through a medium that creates more access for more students.”

—Cody Semrau, founder and CEO, BetterMynd

Teletherapy has been around for more than two decades and can be delivered through videoconferencing, phone or online messaging.

Alternate terms for teletherapy include telebehavioral health, telepsychiatry, e-behavioral health, telemental health, e-care and telecare.

Multiple peer-reviewed studies, including several meta-analyses, show that teletherapy is as effective as in-person therapy for certain conditions.

A handful of university medical centers around the country offer telemedicine services to the broader community.

Typically, these services are designed to provide options for people who live in remote areas and tend to have less access to health specialists.


Link to main story: TeleHELP in higher ed

Some schools now offer training where employees learn to better understand mental illness, to recognize coworkers or family members who may be in trouble, and to encourage people to get help.

The ongoing wave of school violence has forced higher ed to enhance emergency-response training in teacher education programs.

Source: National Behavioral Intervention  Team Association; 2015 survey

After the Virginia Tech tragedy, colleges began to build teams of administrators and faculty to better recognize and support distraught individuals on campus.

Students at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center now receive mental health counseling from the office of Student Academic Support Services and Inclusion.

Here are four strategies to successfully address and manage special dietary needs on campus.

Source: Center for Collegiate Mental Health 2017 Annual Report, tiny.cc/CCMH

For the seventh straight year, the rate of students reporting they may harm themselves—and, in turn, who seek counseling—grew, according to a new report

Deciding exactly what to dedicate funding and space to within residence halls can be a challenge. The answers to a few key questions are important to developing effective offerings.

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