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Articles: Human Resources

Schools are more transparent with employees to avoid second-guessing, but that doesn't mean revealing everything to everyone.

Gemmy Allen is co-coordinator of faculty management programs at North Lake College; Brett Welch is associate professor of Educational Leadership at Lamar University; Kaye Shelton is associate professor of Educational Leadership at Lamar University; and Pam Quinn is provost at LeCroy Center for Human Resources, all in Texas.

Determining employee engagement is the key. Highly engaged faculty will likely see opportunities, while disengaged faculty will focus more on limitations and may have a negative effect on student learning.

Campuses want to tighten security and turn information into action. This has caused an unprecedented surge in demand for safety and data personnel.

Annual performance reviews are shunned for good reason. Many higher education institutions question the wisdom of this antiquated approach and are exploring alternatives.

In a higher education landscape marked by a shrinking student population and increasing uncertainty, institutional longevity—if not short-term survival—is top of mind for most. What many at-risk institutions fail to see, however, is that a primary focus on competition is a precarious survival strategy that more often than not, backfires. Cooperation, not competition is the way out.

Developing and maintaining a strong customer service ethos sometimes brings IT managers into unexpected territory. Following are tips on how to handle four such scenarios.

1. Tackle issues head-on and promptly.

This may be especially important for tech staff who ignore policies, fail to carry their load or can’t seem to get along with co-workers.

“Don’t let the bad behavior of a few poison those who want to work,” says CIO Yvette Brown Koottungal at Barry University in Florida. She is also vice president for technology at the university, where she manages a team of 63.

Let’s face it—running any department at a university, college, or other higher education institution brings unexpected twists and turns each day. This is especially true when it comes to managing the workforce, which is typically a diverse group of employees including hourly and part-time workers, student workers, employees with varied native languages, and more.

In an effort to comply with the impending regulations, Indiana University Bloomington appointed a lawyer to work with various departments that the regulations will most likely affect, including registrars, admissions, HR, facilities and its international office. The university's legal council asked registrars, for instance, to come up with scenarios.

Some schools now offer training where employees learn to better understand mental illness, to recognize coworkers or family members who may be in trouble, and to encourage people to get help.

Regulatory compliance buckets.

Ignoring compliance isn’t an option. Institutional leaders can take action to ensure they’re on the right track today and to reduce the drain on existing resources.

Upon hearing of an employee’s death, HR notifies the individual’s supervisor and suggests a department meeting so coworkers can express their emotions and learn how people grieve differently.

It’s fair to say that university leaders across the country are thinking about how they can promote diversity in their student bodies, faculties and staff.  We believe a fully inclusive work environment helps us deliver on our mission, and research has shown teams that are more diverse and inclusive make better decisions and perform better.

Garnett Stokes, the next president of The University of New Mexico, was one of the last remaining leaders employed at University of Missouri since before the 2015 protests.

Garnett Stokes will be the next president of The University of New Mexico.

We asked: What are your predictions, hopes and concerns for 2018? Administrators and experts who have recently contributed to UB answered.

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