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Articles: Campus Life

The change of Freshmen enrollment at the University of Missouri from 2015 to 2017. (Source: University of Missouri).

Freshman enrollment at the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri has fallen by more than 35 percent since the institution’s well-publicized and racially driven student protests in November 2015, according to a July New York Times article.

With the Trump Administration proposing massive cuts to social programs like food vouchers, children’s health insurance, social disability for the elderly, and temporary assistance for needy families, the Nation faces catastrophic consequences for its social sustainability.

Higher ed institutions—capitalizing on the popularity of the digital pictographs—now offer customized sets of emojis featuring school logos, mascots and other themed graphics, such as smiling or winking faces.

FINDINGS ANNOUNCED, CHARGES MADE—Timothy Piazza’s parents received the news on May 5 that the investigation of his death would result in criminal charges. The frat Beta Theta Pi and eight of its members face manslaughter charges.

The question of how to accommodate Greek life is a continued conundrum for college officials nationwide.

Matthew Poslusny is senior vice president and provost at Meredith College in Raleigh, N.C.

Watching students receive their degrees fills us with pride. However, the ceremony itself often leaves us with dread. How long will it be? Will the names of the students be pronounced correctly?

It’s known that full-time students graduate more quickly and more often than do their part-time counterparts. But what about students who fluctuate between full- and part-time status?

Iowa State is partnering with EdR and River Caddis Development (Memphis) to add 320,000 square feet of student residential and mixed-use retail space to the southwest corner of campus.

Some local agencies across the country help colleges plant trees where the campus community can enjoy them, even if it’s not on campus. (Photo courtesy of Arbor Day Foundation).

Besides reducing emissions, higher ed institutions can reduce the impact of their carbon footprint in other ways, including getting credit for trees planted.

CLICK AND LEARN–The University of Washington’s sustainability map features seven main categories related to higher ed campus sustainability and dozens  of examples, from the location of charging stations to recycling bins.

Many institutions shine a spotlight on their sustainability efforts by creating online maps to showcase eco-friendly sites and green activities on campus—areas of interest to both the student body and the general public.

Keeping college students emotionally healthy comes down to the resources campuses are willing to provide. (GettyImages.com: Solstock)

The growing demand for mental health treatment on campuses resulted in part from a national effort, mounted over the last decade or so, to eliminate stigmas and get more students to seek help when grappling with emotional distress.

MOBILE MINDFULNESS—UT Austin higher ed students and faculty using  Thrive at UT can take a few minutes to read daily and weekly gratitude reflections. Interactive quizzes help students apply the concepts to their own lives.

A well-being app encourages students at The University of Texas at Austin to stay in the moment—via the device that often takes them out of it: their phone.

A PLACE TO GATHER, MOURN, REFLECT—Hours after the April 16 tragedy, a higher ed student organization placed 32 “Hokie Stones” on the campus Drillfield. Later, stones weighing 300 pounds each were permanently placed in the field, with paths to allow for easier viewing.

A decade and well over 100 school shootings since the Virginia Tech tragedy, the higher ed community has considered and implemented changes in policy and practice recommended after the full investigation. 

A link to Virginia Tech’s We Remember website, created immediately after the tragedy, holds a prominent place at the top right of the university’s home page.

Each spring, updated commemoration event information gets posted to the site, www.weremember.vt.edu—with all previous content remaining accessible and the victims’ photos and biographies easy to find.

“Nothing has ever been taken down,” says Mark Owczarski, assistant vice president for news and information at the university. “It’s there as public record.”

Many small towns and rural regions rely on the nation’s 600 rural community and tribal colleges to provide employees who will keep local economies alive.

But these institutions, which also serve as cultural centers, face a range pressures in supporting the day-to-day needs of a dwindling number of high school graduates with less money to spend, says Randy Smith, director of the Rural Community College Alliance.

For instance, Sisseton Wahpeton College in South Dakota—where Smith is president—provides campus shuttle service to students who live as far as 30 miles away.

In looking at colleges for both of my children, one male and one female, I was particularly concerned about the environment on campus and within student housing especially after reading various articles online. As with any parent, there is a lot of anxiety with the child leaving home for the first time. We all feel that we have done the best we can raising our children but we never can tell exactly how the child will respond to the various pressures and freedoms they experience while living on a college campus.

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