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Articles: Fundraising

“Having a physical space for student philanthropy is a clear indication that it matters to the institution,” says Robert Moore, vice president of marketing and communications of the Council for Advancement and Support of Education.


LINK TO MAIN ARTICLE: Growing college student philanthropists


Such spaces give a university “the ability to develop programs and provide intellectual stimulus to students,” he adds.

Most institutions have barely scratched the surface of the latest innovations in mobile fundraising. Here are key actions recommended by those who are making headway.

What are the biggest roadblocks institutions face when it comes to adding/enhancing mobile donation options?

“Nothing is more frustrating than getting to the end of a payment process only to have it fail. This experience could cause a donor to give up and schools to lose valuable dollars. Advancement offices need a secure and reliable platform that allows them to raise funds anywhere, anytime, via any channel.”

—Heather Richmond, senior director of product management and marketing, TouchNet

It’s extremely challenging and costly to build an in-house mobile donation platform, not only because of the technology, but also because of privacy and compliance issues.

That’s why most universities choose to work with providers that have it all figured out, says Caryn Stein, vice president of  marketing at higher ed consulting firm Ruffalo Noel Levitz.

When vetting a vendor, keep these questions in mind:

COOKING UP BETTER HEALTH—Med students at The Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane get hands-on culinary lessons to learn how food preparation and diet impact illness. The center was the first dedicated teaching kitchen to be implemented at a medical school.

More than 40 medical schools have added culinary medicine programs to the menu to help students better understand how to combat obesity, diabetes and other chronic diseases.

Scenario: Small college wants to increase its national visibility and recognition.

Process: Matt Spencer, associate vice president for university advancement, zeros in on alumni with an affinity for the university, identifies their interests and plans visits—using a tool that analyzes social media reactions, comments and event responses of 235,000 digital alumni interactions.

ATTENDEE POWER—Virginia State University board members, friends and staff get strategic about their attendance at the Richmond Forum speaker series, which many local influential people attend. The team aims to make new introductions to the university as well as strengthen existing relationships with key constitutents.

Following are four effective strategies any advancement team can use to build donor support.

Katherine A. Rowe, provost and dean of faculty of Smith College, will begin her tenure as the 28th president of William & Mary.

Starting July 1, Katherine A. Rowe will begin her tenure as the 28th president of William & Mary in Virginia.

Search committees and institutions recruiting academic leaders are often met with a major sticking point: the most appealing candidates often don’t have much fundraising experience. Yet in today’s climate, non-tuition sources of revenue are increasingly important and fundraising provides resources that can truly advance a university’s agenda. Leaders across campus—deans, program directors, functional administrators, research heads, and so on—must be capable of building donor relationships, “making the ask” and securing gifts.

Athletics at the community college level bring far less pomp, circumstance, attention and money than their NCAA Division I counterparts. But that doesn’t mean they don’t play a significant role.

Mirta Martin will be the next president of Fairmont State University. She was previously president of Fort Hays State University in Kansas.

Mirta Martin has been named president of Fairmont State University in West Virginia.

In the case of philanthropy and communications staff, we both desire that our constituencies become enthusiastic supporters and advocates of our institution. It is imperative that these professionals become partners in every sense.  Here’s how.

BEREA, KENTUCKY—President Lyle Roelofs likes to buy running shoes for his students at Berea College—as long as they get some exercise with him twice weekly before class.

Here are seven things higher ed search leaders and administrators believe campus administrators must do in the coming year to get the job done.

 Donald Hasseltine, formerly vice president for development at Brown University, is now a senior consultant with the Aspen Leadership Group.

Alumni participation is falling at a precipitous rate, the number of mid-level major gifts are flat, and annual fund support has struggled to keep pace with inflation.

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