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Articles: Recruitment

Leslie Crosley is a higher ed enrollment management consultant for Ruffalo Noel Levitz. Jim Scannell recently retired as senior consultant for enrollment management at Ruffalo Noel Levitz and is the former president of Scannell & Kurz.

Now more than ever, enrollment leadership requires a coordinated campus team to respond to emerging internal challenges as well as shifting external forces.

Leaders at Marlboro College hope to increase enrollment by 50 percent. At a university such as Ohio State, this would mean adding the population of a small city along with rows of new residence halls and high-tech classrooms.

In looking at colleges for both of my children, one male and one female, I was particularly concerned about the environment on campus and within student housing especially after reading various articles online. As with any parent, there is a lot of anxiety with the child leaving home for the first time. We all feel that we have done the best we can raising our children but we never can tell exactly how the child will respond to the various pressures and freedoms they experience while living on a college campus.

Plenty can go wrong during a presidential turnover—imagine the new leader earning a faculty vote of no confidence early on, or not recognizing a million-dollar donor at a reception. 

14 percent of students started their postsecondary education in a community college, then transferred to a four-year school and earned a bachelor’s degree within six years of entry.

Transitions in senior academic and administrative staff can have nearly as much impact as a new president.

solidarity—About 300 students participated in an Amherst College protest against President Trump’s proposed policies regarding undocumented immigrants. (Takudzwa Tapfuma for The Amherst Student)

President Donald Trump has made immigration reform a centerpiece of his young administration. New policies include banning travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S., and a plan to deport millions of undocumented immigrants.

Source: “International Branch Campuses - Trends and Developments 2016,” Observatory on Borderless Higher Ed

International branch campuses continue to offer American colleges and universities opportunities in branding, enrollment and research. And overseas countries, as luck would have it, are often as eager to host as U.S. universities are to set up shop. 

MONTCLAIR, New Jersey—Montclair State had been a university for only a few years when Susan Cole took over as president in 1998. She wanted the job—her second presidency—because she saw vast, untapped potential on the campus of 12,000 students. She also felt certain that she could, pretty quickly, ensure the institution lived up to its new name.

Fashion Forward—Kent State University students can take a semester-long break from life on the Ohio campus to immerse themselves in fashion design, merchandising or journalism in New York City’s Garment District.

Exotic branch campuses across the globe give American institutions an extra shine when recruiting students and establishing an internationally recognized brand. Now, several universities are finding similar success with satellites in other parts of the U.S.

Shani Lenore-Jenkins is associate vice president of enrollment at Maryville University.

While its primary focus is to educate students, a university is still a business with customers. Traditional marketing methods such as mailings, phone calls and old-fashioned boots-on-the-ground visits are no longer the best ways to reach today’s tech-savvy students, who find the information they need online.

John Meagle is the chief marketing officer at Centenary University in New Jersey.

When Centenary College was granted university status in May, the news was celebrated by students, faculty, alumni and staff. For the marketing and student recruitment team, it was an opportunity to build awareness of the experience the institution offers career-oriented students.

The College-Bound Student E-Expectations Survey asked 3,000 college-bound high school seniors and juniors about their digital habits and expectations—from the start of the recruiting cycle. Here’s a selection of the top insights from the study.

Aaron Mahl is a vice president and consultant at Ruffalo Noel Levitz.

Large public universities and smaller liberal arts colleges, on the other hand, are finding it increasingly difficult to maintain their male enrollments. The National Center for Education Statistics projects that, by 2020, men will represent only 41 percent of college enrollees.

John L. Gann, Jr., consults, trains, and writes on marketing. He is author of "The Third Lifetime Place: A New Economic Opportunity for College Towns."

Although their leaders might claim otherwise, ratings by U.S. News, Princeton Review and others are of outsized importance to universities today. But what about the many colleges that didn’t rank high with these reviewers? How can they compete with the list-toppers?

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