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Articles: Recruitment

Gemmy Allen is co-coordinator of faculty management programs at North Lake College; Brett Welch is associate professor of Educational Leadership at Lamar University; Kaye Shelton is associate professor of Educational Leadership at Lamar University; and Pam Quinn is provost at LeCroy Center for Human Resources, all in Texas.

Determining employee engagement is the key. Highly engaged faculty will likely see opportunities, while disengaged faculty will focus more on limitations and may have a negative effect on student learning.

Academics

The mantra of “if you build it, they will come” has a bit of truth when recruiting international students to community colleges.

“The most fundamental thing that we do is make sure we’re providing quality programs, because the best way to attract new students is through word of mouth,” says Denise Kinsella, interim dean of the International Education Center at Santa Monica College in California.

Before an international student can receive an F-1 visa to study in the United States, the student must apply to the U.S. consulate in their home country with an I-20 Certificate of Eligibility.

It is the higher education institution’s responsibility to ensure that accepted international students have all of the necessary admission requirements prior to the designated school official issuing the I-20 certificate.

Each country has different lengths of time in which students wait for a visa to come to the United States.

What do you see as the biggest barrier to community colleges enrolling more international students?

“Community colleges need to focus not just on recruiting international students but retaining the ones already enrolled. Understanding who these students are and proactively engaging with them creates a stronger reputation and will ultimately attract more international students to that community college.”

—Peter Bruynzeel, vice president, Millennium Software Solutions

Here are five actions two-year institutions can take to recruit international students.

Marc C. Whitt is director of philanthropy communications at University of Kentucky Philanthropy. Follow him on LinkedIn (linkedin.com/in/marcwhitt) or Twitter (@marcwhitt). 

The marketing strategy “one size fits most” no longer works for higher ed philanthropy thanks to the seismic sociological changes that a multigenerational America is now experiencing.

Instagram’s strategy of copying most feature introduced by Snapchat has resulted in several schools pausing efforts with the latter and redirecting them to the former.

Lori Garrett is a senior principal and vice president at Glavé & Holmes Architecture in Richmond, Virginia. She can be contacted at LGarrett@glaveandholmes.com.

The design of admissions centers, whether in new buildings or renovated facilities, plays a critical role in any campus visit. Three best practices stand out.

Landscaping strives to achieve the following four goals as they prioritize a never-ending list of pressing everyday tasks as well as find time and resources for more intensive projects.

Admissions at the University of Mississippi recently began incorporating language about landscaping services' many accomplishments in mailers to prospective students.

For example, they now mention various awards that the department has earned over the years, such as most beautiful campus by USA Today.

Others include "You had me at Hotty Toddy," an Ole Miss expression that people now relate to the five national championships that the university's landscaping services have won.

Here are some ways to cut through the clutter and close the deal with a certain type of prospective students who are fondly called “stealth” applicants.

Led by admissions offices, higher ed institutions are enticing accepted students to officially enroll by using innovative communication approaches, developing peer connections and making students feel as if they are already part of the family.

At the Hyatt Regency Cambridge, along the scenic Charles River overlooking Boston, a few dozen college presidents and provosts gathered in early May for a day focused on achieving campus harmony. Called the Campus Climate Summit: Getting from Contention to Consensus, the event was sponsored by Thoughtexchange, a provider of stakeholder engagement solutions for leaders of colleges and other organizations.

A few months after Boston University’s successful merger with Wheelock College, the University of Massachusetts drew a greater degree of scrutiny for its acquisition of Mount Ida College.

Scenario: Small college wants to increase its national visibility and recognition.

Process: Matt Spencer, associate vice president for university advancement, zeros in on alumni with an affinity for the university, identifies their interests and plans visits—using a tool that analyzes social media reactions, comments and event responses of 235,000 digital alumni interactions.

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