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Articles: Admissions

CLEAR GOALS FOR A CLEAR PATH—Students accepted to Kansas State U under conditional admissions work closely with academic coaches during freshman year.

Higher ed institutions tap into the trend of offering conditional admissions—opening up possibilities for less prepared students and maintaining enrollment.

For many low-income students, lack of encouragement at home and fear of rejection limits interest in higher ed. Conditional admissions gives these individuals the chance to consider universities they thought were out of their reach.

EQUATE THIS—A student from Yale School of Management’s Class of 2019 works out an equation during the program’s summer math camp.

Post-grad business schools are identifying opportunities to prep incoming students for the rigorous coursework, particularly as more students are admitted without traditional business backgrounds.

With studies indicating that test success is relative to family income, high school quality and cultural identity, some schools are turning to other methods, including essays and short videos, to select prospective students.

Scott Cowen, former president of Tulane University in New Orleans, is the author of Winnebagos on Wednesday: How Visionary Leadership Can Transform Higher Education (Princeton University Press, 2018).

In Winnebagos on Wednesday: How Visionary Leadership Can Transform Higher Education, Scott Cowen shows how today’s university is evolving, and how to avoid losing sight of institutional strengths and values.

Creating an online community that mirrors a school’s physical campus is another way to retain online students.

This can be achieved by digitizing freshman orientation, mental health counseling, and career and résumé services.


Link to main story: College students learning online, but stepping on campus

The public’s call for more transparency in all segments of higher education administration has brought particular scrutiny to the admissions process. The fairness of race is again under question.

Academics

The mantra of “if you build it, they will come” has a bit of truth when recruiting international students to community colleges.

“The most fundamental thing that we do is make sure we’re providing quality programs, because the best way to attract new students is through word of mouth,” says Denise Kinsella, interim dean of the International Education Center at Santa Monica College in California.

Before an international student can receive an F-1 visa to study in the United States, the student must apply to the U.S. consulate in their home country with an I-20 Certificate of Eligibility.

It is the higher education institution’s responsibility to ensure that accepted international students have all of the necessary admission requirements prior to the designated school official issuing the I-20 certificate.

Each country has different lengths of time in which students wait for a visa to come to the United States.

What do you see as the biggest barrier to community colleges enrolling more international students?

“Community colleges need to focus not just on recruiting international students but retaining the ones already enrolled. Understanding who these students are and proactively engaging with them creates a stronger reputation and will ultimately attract more international students to that community college.”

—Peter Bruynzeel, vice president, Millennium Software Solutions

Here are five actions two-year institutions can take to recruit international students.

Lori Garrett is a senior principal and vice president at Glavé & Holmes Architecture in Richmond, Virginia. She can be contacted at LGarrett@glaveandholmes.com.

The design of admissions centers, whether in new buildings or renovated facilities, plays a critical role in any campus visit. Three best practices stand out.

Marion Technical College’s Buy-One, Get-One tuition model will fund all sophomore-year tuition costs for students working toward an associate’s degree.

Admissions at the University of Mississippi recently began incorporating language about landscaping services' many accomplishments in mailers to prospective students.

For example, they now mention various awards that the department has earned over the years, such as most beautiful campus by USA Today.

Others include "You had me at Hotty Toddy," an Ole Miss expression that people now relate to the five national championships that the university's landscaping services have won.

Here are some ways to cut through the clutter and close the deal with a certain type of prospective students who are fondly called “stealth” applicants.

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