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Articles: Financial Aid

Attention to underserved students may be well spent on single mothers, a growing demographic on campus.

Thinking beyond painfully slashing big line items, higher ed leaders can realize significant savings in finding smaller cuts that, all together, add up to make a huge impact.

The Trump administration’s plan to phase out DACA by not accepting new applicants is another shift in immigration laws that leaves many students unsure of their status on and off campus.

Jennifer Wick is vice president for consulting services at Ruffalo Noel Levitz.

It has become increasingly difficult for some four-year institutions to meet enrollment goals for first-year students.

Just as students were headed back to campuses in southeastern Texas in late August, Hurricane Harvey struck.

More than 500 colleges and universities provide some type of resource to help students address unexpected financial emergencies, according to a 2016 study by NASPA.

While most institutions use financial aid systems to award and distribute regular financial aid, that isn’t always the case with emergency aid. Usually, each student’s situation must be evaluated  to determine whether emergency financial help is warranted and if so, at what level.

That process isn’t always built into the standard financial aid system—so institutions often need to get creative to make it automated.

Dual enrollment is designed to increase access and degree attainment. In fact, a 2007 study found that 67 percent of dual-enrollment students enrolled in college after high school (compared to 50 percent of their peers), with 30 percent earning an associate’s degree along with their high school diploma.

Yet students often experience barriers to enrollment.

Private college leaders want to collaborate more closely on issues of access and affordability—but federal antitrust laws prevent institutions from even having discussion about them.

As the term “free college” draws applicants and ever-more media attention, states, cities and colleges are learning the realities of these large-scale aid programs.

Reducing student financial aid packages based on scholarship funding from outside sources, a common practice, will no longer happen at public colleges in Maryland.

TEXT WHAT’S NEXT—Georgia State University’s text messaging program boosted enrollment by reminding incoming students of key deadlines and answering their questions.

Colleges and universities should be texting students—but not everyone, not all the time, and not about everything that’s happening on campus.

Sara Goldrick-Rab is a professor at Temple University and author of Paying the Price: College Costs, Financial Aid, and the Betrayal of the American Dream.

In Paying the Price: College Costs, Financial Aid, and the Betrayal of the American Dream, Goldrick-Rab describes what was learned from studying how changes to higher ed financial aid impacts young people and families.

Top topics for a student financial responsibility agreement.

While the concept may seem unnecessary, a formal document—signed by each student—that states tuition payments are, in fact, expected is now required by a majority of colleges.

DREAMER PRIDE—A participant certificate awarded for the completion of Sacramento State’s Dreamer Ally training explains the meaning of its hummingbird logo. These birds are known for overcoming challenges, and  the circle represents a reminder that undocumented students are welcome.

With the specter of a federal crackdown on illegal immigration looming, higher ed institutions are finding ways to better serve undocumented students, and also protect their identities.

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