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Articles: Financial Aid

Regulatory compliance buckets.

Ignoring compliance isn’t an option. Institutional leaders can take action to ensure they’re on the right track today and to reduce the drain on existing resources.

The emergence of two new degree programs and two graduate certificates shows the complexity of compliance.

In recent years, the rate of hiring of compliance-related administrative officers has exceeded that of faculty, says Steve Hoffman, who consults with colleges on policies and procedures regarding tax issues and concerns.

Widener University in Pennsylvania now offers a master of jurisprudence in higher education compliance through its Delaware Law School.

Admissions, enrollment, marketing, retention and financial aid administrators surveyed generally have a sunny outlook about the student population in 2018.

Bill Berg is an enrollment management consultant at Ruffalo Noel Levitz.

There’s no question that recent graduates are leaving college with more student loan debt. More students are taking out loans and they’re borrowing larger amounts.

We asked: What are your predictions, hopes and concerns for 2018? Administrators and experts who have recently contributed to UB answered.

Attention to underserved students may be well spent on single mothers, a growing demographic on campus.

Thinking beyond painfully slashing big line items, higher ed leaders can realize significant savings in finding smaller cuts that, all together, add up to make a huge impact.

The Trump administration’s plan to phase out DACA by not accepting new applicants is another shift in immigration laws that leaves many students unsure of their status on and off campus.

Just as students were headed back to campuses in southeastern Texas in late August, Hurricane Harvey struck.

Jennifer Wick is vice president for consulting services at Ruffalo Noel Levitz.

It has become increasingly difficult for some four-year institutions to meet enrollment goals for first-year students.

More than 500 colleges and universities provide some type of resource to help students address unexpected financial emergencies, according to a 2016 study by NASPA.

While most institutions use financial aid systems to award and distribute regular financial aid, that isn’t always the case with emergency aid. Usually, each student’s situation must be evaluated  to determine whether emergency financial help is warranted and if so, at what level.

That process isn’t always built into the standard financial aid system—so institutions often need to get creative to make it automated.

Dual enrollment is designed to increase access and degree attainment. In fact, a 2007 study found that 67 percent of dual-enrollment students enrolled in college after high school (compared to 50 percent of their peers), with 30 percent earning an associate’s degree along with their high school diploma.

Yet students often experience barriers to enrollment.

Private college leaders want to collaborate more closely on issues of access and affordability—but federal antitrust laws prevent institutions from even having discussion about them.

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