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Articles: Software

Now hearing-impaired students can see real-time captioning of spoken events, also referred to as live captioning.

What roadblocks are colleges coming up against in expanding access for hard-of-hearing students during class and at live events?

“While budgets and regulatory awareness can be roadblocks to accessing university classes and events, technology is the greatest challenge to delivering live captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing community.

 Crowd-powered captioning Like with crowdfunding, the future of live captioning may be powered by a group.

With professional captionists costing as much as $100 per hour, a lower-cost solution is in the works to allow groups of average typists to provide real-time captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing. Legion:Scribe is making that happen.

Whether it’s on-site or remote, captions will vary in quality, says Margaret Camp, director of student accessibility services at Clemson University.

Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) is considered the most accurate level of transcription, which is “utterance-for-utterance,” she says.

The captionist types everything heard. However, this level of accuracy costs twice as much as another form of live captioning, called “meaning-for-meaning.”

The UBTech 2017 session “Teaching With Glass” offered insights into a powerful yet affordable approach to recording lectures in a natural style.

Below is a closer look at how two universities, Butler University in Indiana and the University of Florida, are enhancing learning videos for their online courses.

Butler University: Adding quizzes to video

Technology used: Panopto video platform for recording lectures

Interactive boosts: Voiceover can be added to PowerPoint slides. When the instructor finds a place in the presentation to add a quiz, the video gets edited and a multiple-choice, true/false or multiple-answers type of question can be inserted.

Here are some examples of content ideas for interactive video content as well as best practices that are already employed by various universities and colleges across the U.S.

The disconnect between students’ digital lives and their classroom experience is narrowing as professors are increasingly embedding video in their courses—for both in-person and online learning.

Carol Patton is a Las Vegas-based writer who specializes in human resources issues.

The University of Santa Monica has implemented an HR information system along with a new management platform called Employee Self-Onboarding by BambooHR.

DIGITIZE THIS—Students scan Civil War documents at Bowdoin College.

The mass digitization of literature is complex. The preservation of books, letters and other historical materials calls for advanced technology and a good deal of manpower. Universities are developing better practices around this process, as well as creating software and databases to make this content accessible and search-friendly.

SCHOLARLY PURSUITS— SUNY Oneonta awards badges to participants in its annual Research and Creativity Day. Each April, students present projects—from research papers to video documentaries—they’ve completed independently and with faculty mentors.

Diplomas—those venerable printed documents that lack hotlinks and interactivity features—have lost some of their luster.

Amid students cutting textiles, making shoes, firing ceramics and making prints at the Parsons School of Design’s Making Center in midtown Manhattan is a whole wall of 3D printers.

The essence of 3D printing is a concept called additive manufacturing that builds up the item one layer at a time.

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT—At  The University of Arizona, academic advisors know that every student matters when it comes to retention, not just because each individual’s success is important but also because they realize that retaining just a few extra students raises overall retention rates.

There’s no doubt that higher ed institutions have access to tons of student data these days, but what separates actionable insights from analytics overload?

Higher ed administrators are using apps and platforms behind the scenes to help create efficiencies, increase productivity, and manage projects and workflow.

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