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Articles: Software

Train both students and faculty

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke uses WebEx to allow students—even those in very remote areas with no broadband internet access—to provide access to lectures online. The IT team initially offered training and on-demand assistance for students only, but its popularity inspired a new category of training focused on helping faculty too, says Nancy Crouch, associate vice chancellor for technology resources and chief information officer.

While providing access to courses is essential to educating students in remote areas, helping them feel they are a part of the campus community is another key piece for retention and completion efforts.

What: A branded campus app used to connect students with courses and campus life

Where: Lindsey Wilson College, located on the southern tip of rural Appalachia, in Columbia, Kentucky

What are the biggest technology barriers for students in rural areas who want to pursue postsecondary education but can’t get to a campus? How can colleges break through those barriers?

“The greatest challenge for students in rural areas involves access to engaging and pedagogically sound mobile learning experiences. Through investments in accessibility, a focus on mobile learning and a data-informed approach to instructional design, institutions have the opportunity to increase access and see more students graduate with high-quality credentials.”

Here’s how four institutions are bridging the gap between their campuses and students based in rural areas. 

As more textbooks and other learning materials become digitized, institutions regularly face challenges in smoothly integrating all the different resources into the LMS and other campus networks.

What should campus administrators consider as they integrate their digital textbooks and e-learning materials with their LMS and SIS systems? 

“Campus administrators need to ensure they understand their student experience goals relating to digital content. The technology ecosystem they use to manage and deliver this experience needs to be considered in full, and in service of their student needs—including privacy, content performance data and individual student data.”

—Ken Chapman, vice president of Market Research, D2L

Integration between digital learning materials and an institution’s learning and administrative systems has gotten better, but instructors, higher ed administrators and providers agree there’s more work to be done.

That work, providers say, is easier when all parties pitch in to figure out how to best serve students.

Annual performance reviews are shunned for good reason. Many higher education institutions question the wisdom of this antiquated approach and are exploring alternatives.

As huddle rooms within academic buildings grow in popularity, what challenges—perhaps unexpected ones—tend to crop up for administrators and professors? 

The massive growth of on-campus video is increasing the desire for innovations that naturally leverage the benefits of artificial intelligence.

The growing interest in artificial intelligence may hold the key to a more personalized learning experience.

Whether you call them huddle rooms, breakout rooms or collaboration rooms, small group spaces cropping up in various campus buildings are changing the way academic facilities are used.

ATTENDEE POWER—Virginia State University board members, friends and staff get strategic about their attendance at the Richmond Forum speaker series, which many local influential people attend. The team aims to make new introductions to the university as well as strengthen existing relationships with key constitutents.

Following are four effective strategies any advancement team can use to build donor support.

In 2006, a group of small colleges was at a crossroads.  The grant that the schools had received to pay for the license for its commercial Learning Management System (LMS) had come to an end, and the schools couldn’t afford to continue paying for it.  One attractive alternative was an open source LMS. Even though the hosting and support would require financial resources, the software license for open source is affordable: it’s free.

Why is digital marketing—so easily measurable—not measured in higher education at the level it is in other industries?

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