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Articles: Internet

What roadblocks are colleges coming up against in expanding access for hard-of-hearing students during class and at live events?

“While budgets and regulatory awareness can be roadblocks to accessing university classes and events, technology is the greatest challenge to delivering live captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing community.

 Crowd-powered captioning Like with crowdfunding, the future of live captioning may be powered by a group.

With professional captionists costing as much as $100 per hour, a lower-cost solution is in the works to allow groups of average typists to provide real-time captioning for the deaf and hard of hearing. Legion:Scribe is making that happen.

Whether it’s on-site or remote, captions will vary in quality, says Margaret Camp, director of student accessibility services at Clemson University.

Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART) is considered the most accurate level of transcription, which is “utterance-for-utterance,” she says.

The captionist types everything heard. However, this level of accuracy costs twice as much as another form of live captioning, called “meaning-for-meaning.”

Curious about the digital habits of college-bound high school students? Since 2005, the E-Expectations report has offered a deep dive into their needs and desires

In the two years since Northern Arizona University launched a virtual 360-degree campus tour, more than 30,000 people have explored the campus virtually.

Why should colleges and universities invest financial resources in augmented and virtual reality?

“Augmented and virtual reality systems can actually reduce the financial burden on university and college programs that require a lot of consumables or expensive hands-on training systems. … I’ve seen a community college reduce the cost of its welding program from $2,800 to $1,800 per student per semester based on material savings alone.”

—Gary Daniels, consultant, Amtek Company

Marc C. Whitt is director of philanthropy communications at the University of Kentucky Office of Philanthropy. He may be followed on LinkedIn ( or Twitter (@marcwhitt).

In a 2017 study conducted by the Pew Research Center, nearly 7 in 10 Americans reported using social media “to connect with one another, engage with news content, share information and entertain themselves.”

The 10 higher education institutions with the most credentials on the dark web. (Source: Dark Web ID).

It’s no secret that college and university networks have long been prone to cyberattacks of various kinds.

A century-old Gothic high school has been transformed into a new biological sciences education and research center as well as the new home for the New Jersey Innovation Institute.

Kelly Walsh is CIO of The College of Westchester in New York.

Growth forecasts suggest tens of billions of devices will be connected as spending exceeds $1 trillion by 2020, according the 2017 NMC Horizons Report for Higher Education.

The interest in live videos across social media platforms has accelerated over the past few months with a series of developments that bring high-quality video broadcasting to the masses.

Joseph Brennan is vice president of communications and marketing, and clinical professor of business at the University at Albany. Mark Weaver owns Communications Counsel, an Ohio-based firm that advises universities on crisis communications. He teaches at The Ohio State University College of Law, the University of Akron, and the School of Government at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Based on our decades of experience counseling campus CEOs, we’ve identified the key behaviors successful presidents use to lead their institutions through the tough times.

Phishing is just one type of “social engineering”—the criminal act of manipulating people to surrender confidential information. In the past five years, it’s become a constant threat, and many college leaders see it as the No. 1 cybercrime they face.

In a move that will ultimately bring its public online content in line with new federal accessibility standards, the University of California, Berkeley has begun removing older videos and other documents that don’t meet the mark.

A PLACE TO GATHER, MOURN, REFLECT—Hours after the April 16 tragedy, a higher ed student organization placed 32 “Hokie Stones” on the campus Drillfield. Later, stones weighing 300 pounds each were permanently placed in the field, with paths to allow for easier viewing.

A decade and well over 100 school shootings since the Virginia Tech tragedy, the higher ed community has considered and implemented changes in policy and practice recommended after the full investigation.