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Articles: Facilities

Admissions at the University of Mississippi recently began incorporating language about landscaping services' many accomplishments in mailers to prospective students.

For example, they now mention various awards that the department has earned over the years, such as most beautiful campus by USA Today.

Others include "You had me at Hotty Toddy," an Ole Miss expression that people now relate to the five national championships that the university's landscaping services have won.

Where do campuses fall short on groundskeeping and landscaping, and what misconceptions do administrators outside of facilities departments have about groundskeeping?

The entire country of England, the city of Seattle and several U.S. campuses have targeted the simple drinking straw as a relatively easy way to operate more sustainably.

Landscaping strives to achieve the following four goals as they prioritize a never-ending list of pressing everyday tasks as well as find time and resources for more intensive projects.

Campuses want to tighten security and turn information into action. This has caused an unprecedented surge in demand for safety and data personnel.

Patricia McGuire is president of Trinity Washington University. 

A recent report reveals that as many as 36 percent of students across socio-economic levels experience food insecurity at some point during their college days.

At Boise State University's Micron Center for Materials Research, students and faculty will have access to 40 research laboratories and other spaces.

ENERGETIC ALLIES—Hampshire College, which operates a solar farm on its Massachusetts campus (above), has joined a coalition of four other small colleges to buy power from a new solar farm in Maine.

Five New England colleges have teamed up in a unique partnership, choosing a site in Farmington, Maine, for a solar-power farm that will reduce carbon footprints on each campus and show students sustainability in action.

Source: Alcohol and Other Drug Use at UMass Amherst Survey, 2012

Continued binge drinking and destructive student behavior have driven higher ed leaders to refine off-campus behavior policies.

As huddle rooms within academic buildings grow in popularity, what challenges—perhaps unexpected ones—tend to crop up for administrators and professors? 

BLUE LIGHT BEACON—Kansas State University Police monitor phone call boxes located throughout the campus.  Besides seeking help in an emergency or reporting other incidents, the community is also encouraged the use the boxes for wayfinding assistance. (Cindy Hollingsworth).

Mobile apps, text alerts, personal panic buttons and other new technologies give students more ways to communicate safety concerns.

What role does visible security technology play in deterring campus crime and giving students, prospective students/families, and others peace of mind?

SAVE A LIFE—Bridgewater State Police Chief David Tillinghast kicked off the university’s Narcan program, which provides training on use of the overdose-reversal drug. It is stored in 50 public places across campus.

Training is underway at colleges and universities to teach more people how to administer the drug that reverses opioid overdoses.

In his trainings with students, faculty and staff, Detective Sgt. Robert McEvoy, of the Bridgewater State University Police in Massachusetts, details the following signs of an opioid overdose.

These signs are:


Link to main story: Colleges train to reverse opioid overdoses


A few months after Boston University’s successful merger with Wheelock College, the University of Massachusetts drew a greater degree of scrutiny for its acquisition of Mount Ida College.

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