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Articles: Facilities

THE BIG EVENT—In 2016, when President Barack Obama visited the University of Nebraska at Omaha, more than 10,000 higher ed students, faculty, staff and community members attended an event at the campus arena.

Colleges may already prepare extensively for VIPs, but a deeper level of cross-campus coordination can ensure a smooth visit even when protests or other disruptions occur.

Most higher ed institutions have issued plastic campus cards for decades based on a 30-year business model. Perhaps it’s time for administrators to review this process in light of current technology and dramatic shifts in generational expectations.

No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal assistance. —20 U.S.C. § 1681(a), better known as Title IX

SAFE ZONE—Kent State higher ed students with gluten intolerance need not worry when eating at Prentice Café, since the entire facility is gluten-free.

The number of U.S. colleges offering gluten-free dining options is rising, as more people learn about the seriousness of celiac disease, says Chris Rich, vice president of development for the Gluten Intolerance Group.

Colleges and universities taking extra care to improve the safety and quality of life for students with food allergies can participate in the Food Allergy Research & Education’s College Food Allergy Program, which launched in 2014.

In 2015, FARE chose 12 colleges nationwide to participate in a pilot program, and in 2016 the organization announced the expansion of the program to 23 additional institutions.

One of the overall goals is improving access for potential students and parents to information about food allergy accommodation efforts at colleges and universities.

Anne M. Tompkins is a partner at Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft. A. Joseph Jay III is a special counsel at CW&T. Colleen Kukowski is an associate at CW&T, focused on compliance issues. Alex Hokenson is a law clerk in CW&T’s White Collar Defense and Investigations group.

While it is laudable that schools have engaged in a national effort to combat sexual assault on campus, they may find their focus has led to ignoring important due process considerations for the accused in the adjudicatory process. 

The Core Campus Project—a mixed-use addition to Clemson University—includes student housing, retail and residential dining, and is also a centralized home for the Calhoun Honors College.

A PLACE TO GATHER, MOURN, REFLECT—Hours after the April 16 tragedy, a higher ed student organization placed 32 “Hokie Stones” on the campus Drillfield. Later, stones weighing 300 pounds each were permanently placed in the field, with paths to allow for easier viewing.

A decade and well over 100 school shootings since the Virginia Tech tragedy, the higher ed community has considered and implemented changes in policy and practice recommended after the full investigation. 

A link to Virginia Tech’s We Remember website, created immediately after the tragedy, holds a prominent place at the top right of the university’s home page.

Each spring, updated commemoration event information gets posted to the site, www.weremember.vt.edu—with all previous content remaining accessible and the victims’ photos and biographies easy to find.

“Nothing has ever been taken down,” says Mark Owczarski, assistant vice president for news and information at the university. “It’s there as public record.”

Many small towns and rural regions rely on the nation’s 600 rural community and tribal colleges to provide employees who will keep local economies alive.

But these institutions, which also serve as cultural centers, face a range pressures in supporting the day-to-day needs of a dwindling number of high school graduates with less money to spend, says Randy Smith, director of the Rural Community College Alliance.

For instance, Sisseton Wahpeton College in South Dakota—where Smith is president—provides campus shuttle service to students who live as far as 30 miles away.

In uncertain political times, some higher ed lobbyists say their most important role may be blocking legislation that could harm their client colleges and universities. 

Ten years ago, few universities employed chief information security officers. Now these administrators—known as CISOs—lead teams dedicated to shielding information, systems and research from internet thieves, and to keeping up with federal regulations.

STANDARD CARE—Research college labs are required to meet federal animal research standards, which includes the need to provide a clean environment and adequate care.

Following a spate of violence aimed at animal research facilities in the late 1990s, universities have worked to create greater transparency around scientific testing while maintaining stringent security to protect staff and animals. 

Campus discussions about spend analytics might sound like a late night infomercial: Implement the technology and save millions!

The newest addition to the Boca Raton campus is a 96,000-square-foot state-of-the-art football practice facility and academic space.

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