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Articles: Administration & Management

MAKING A STATEMENT—Adams State University President Beverlee J. McClure (left) and Vice President Chris Gilmer display the “Declaration of Rights of Historically Underserved Students” at their higher ed institution.

A newly formed academic center at Adams State University in Colorado aims to improve historically underserved and first-generation students’ chances of enrolling in and graduating from college.

In 13 Midwestern states, veterans can now receive college credit for military vocational skills and trades learned working on base or in the field.

Recent lawsuits have alleged that certain colleges breached the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), which states employers that sponsor retirement plans have a fiduciary responsibility to prudently manage those plans on the behalf of their employees.

Eight prominent universities—including University of Pennsylvania, Duke, Emory, Johns Hopkins, Vanderbilt and others—were hit with separate lawsuits in August 2016 alleging the institutions mishandled their employee retirement plans.

NEW OPPORTUNITIES—Current and former inmates of the Fishkill Correctional Facility north of New York City graduate in 2015 from a Nyack College program that has a 100 percent success rate in keeping its students from being sent back to prison. (Babita Patel)

In a recent off-Broadway production of West Side Story, directed by the provost of Nyack College, located north of New York City, the student who played Officer Krupke had once been arrested for impersonating a police officer.

MONTCLAIR, New Jersey—Montclair State had been a university for only a few years when Susan Cole took over as president in 1998. She wanted the job—her second presidency—because she saw vast, untapped potential on the campus of 12,000 students. She also felt certain that she could, pretty quickly, ensure the institution lived up to its new name.

The Professor Watchlist, launched last fall by the nonprofit Turning Point USA, challenges students: “Help us expose and document college professors who discriminate against conservative students and advance leftist propaganda in the classroom.” 

In “The Death and Life of Great American Cities" Jane Jacobs reminds us that “Lively, diverse, intense cities contain the seeds of their own regeneration, with energy enough to carry over for problems and needs outside themselves".

Paul Drayton, president of Rowan College at Burlington County in New Jersey, says higher education remains far too expensive for many students who are most dependent on it for career success.

“College is more important than ever for career success, yet too expensive for far too many students. 3+1 provides all the benefits of both community colleges and four-year universities while lowering the tuition and debt burden on students and increasing our capacity to serve more students at both community colleges and universities. This is the future model of college affordability.”

Now that the dust is beginning to settle from the political tsunami created by the campaign vitriol, many folks in the education community are ready to challenge the subliminal messages of building the wall, deporting the immigrants, and removing the safety nets that support the Nation’s underserved Latino populations.    

Williams will be a keynote higher ed presenter during UBTech 2017 at The Omni ChampionsGate Resort in Orlando, June 12-14.

He holds a law degree and an MBA. He has a background as a dot-com pioneer, corporate chief, consultant, and world traveler. He’s an experienced pilot and also sang in an award-winning male chorus. John Williams, president of Muhlenberg College in Pennsylvania, might well be a contender for Dos Equis’ next World’s Most Interesting Man.

LAWMAKER PERSUASION— Tim Tai, a University of Missouri student photojournalist, testified in support of the New Voices press freedom bill in higher ed during an April 2016 Missouri House of Representatives committee meeting. (Beatriz Costa-Lima)

Campus newspapers face many of the same challenges confronting the professional media—inconsistent readership, dwindling financial resources, and competition with bloggers and social media.

Outlook 2017 is UB’s third annual special issue aimed at providing insight on the major trends expected to impact campus leaders in the year to come.

American higher education in 2016 faced increased pressure on performance. Colleges and universities were also being pushed to eliminate administrative and academic silos to help students of all ages and backgrounds succeed. Here’s a look back at what made headlines in higher ed this past year and how campuses responded.

A Texas judge’s eleventh-hour injunction against a controversial labor regulation change has left more than 4 million U.S. workers, including thousands in higher education, in limbo. Scheduled to go into effect December 1, the so-called Overtime Rule would have made full-time employees earning less than $47,476 eligible for a pay raise or overtime pay.

MONUMENTAL DISPLAY AT COLLEGE—The Anaconda Wire and Cable Company monument at Chapman University is made entirely of materials from the industrial plant that used to stand where its film school is now located.

In a renewal of social consciousness in American higher ed, colleges are refining stories of their history told through statues, signage and installations on campus. Many are turning this into an aesthetic opportunity, with historically accurate, engaging content presented in ways that visually enhance and individualize the campus. The concept is known as ambient learning.

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