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Articles: Administration & Management

Richard L. Riccardi is senior associate provost and dean of libraries at Rider University.

In this era of increased accountability, diminishing resources and fierce competition, institutions have begun to see a culture of data-informed decision-making as a necessity instead of a luxury.

Admissions at the University of Mississippi recently began incorporating language about landscaping services' many accomplishments in mailers to prospective students.

For example, they now mention various awards that the department has earned over the years, such as most beautiful campus by USA Today.

Others include "You had me at Hotty Toddy," an Ole Miss expression that people now relate to the five national championships that the university's landscaping services have won.

Where do campuses fall short on groundskeeping and landscaping, and what misconceptions do administrators outside of facilities departments have about groundskeeping?

Marion Technical College’s Buy-One, Get-One tuition model will fund all sophomore-year tuition costs for students working toward an associate’s degree.

Landscaping strives to achieve the following four goals as they prioritize a never-ending list of pressing everyday tasks as well as find time and resources for more intensive projects.

Campuses want to tighten security and turn information into action. This has caused an unprecedented surge in demand for safety and data personnel.

Patricia McGuire is president of Trinity Washington University. 

A recent report reveals that as many as 36 percent of students across socio-economic levels experience food insecurity at some point during their college days.

As more textbooks and other learning materials become digitized, institutions regularly face challenges in smoothly integrating all the different resources into the LMS and other campus networks.

Annual performance reviews are shunned for good reason. Many higher education institutions question the wisdom of this antiquated approach and are exploring alternatives.

Source: “College Completion Through a Latino Lens”; Excelencia in Education, 2018

Latino students complete degrees at lower rates than other ethnic groups—and are more likely to still be enrolled after six years. Higher ed institutions are developing supports as a result.

Elaine Maimon is president of Governors State University and author of "Leading Academic Change: Vision, Strategy, Transformation."  Maimon also co-founded the “Writing Across the Curriculum” movement.

In Leading Academic Change, Governors State University President Elaine Maimon discusses the challenge of turning the two-year school into a four-year, full-service, regional public university.

In a higher education landscape marked by a shrinking student population and increasing uncertainty, institutional longevity—if not short-term survival—is top of mind for most. What many at-risk institutions fail to see, however, is that a primary focus on competition is a precarious survival strategy that more often than not, backfires. Cooperation, not competition is the way out.

Institutional resiliency is a daunting challenge for smaller, tuition-dependent, change-resistant institutions. Indeed, the most vulnerable of these fragile colleges and universities may soon face extinction.

Astrid Tuminez will become president of Utah Valley University, effective this fall.

Astrid Tuminez will leave Microsoft to hold her first executive-level higher ed leadership position when she becomes president of Utah Valley University, effective this fall.

ENERGETIC ALLIES—Hampshire College, which operates a solar farm on its Massachusetts campus (above), has joined a coalition of four other small colleges to buy power from a new solar farm in Maine.

Five New England colleges have teamed up in a unique partnership, choosing a site in Farmington, Maine, for a solar-power farm that will reduce carbon footprints on each campus and show students sustainability in action.

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