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Articles: Administration & Management

We hear it all the time—complaints about the inefficiency of public higher education in Massachusetts. These complaints are often based on the incorrect assumption that providing students with a choice—the choice of where, when, and what to study is necessarily inefficient. How do we provide choice in an efficient way? I’ll answer that from my corner of public higher education.  

Here are nine places to foster ties among faculty and students.

Kim Tolley is a professor of education at Notre Dame de Namur University and author of In Professors in the Gig Economy (Johns Hopkins, 2018).

In Professors in the Gig Economy, Kim Tolley brings together experts who have been involved with unionization at public and private colleges and universities.

George Birnbaum is New York-based attorney specializing in the academic, finance and media sectors.

In our experience, there are important differences between the contractual arrangements offered to a presidential candidate who will be serving a first term at a particular institution, and those which can be negotiated for a sitting president whose value and worth has already been tested.

 Michael A. Cioce is president of Rowan College at Burlington County.

We have actually reduced costs for students with a path to a bachelor’s degree that costs about $25,000—less than what most universities charge for a single year.

What began as a push to increase the number and diversity of students studying STEM has evolved into a full-scale effort to improve teaching and learning.

In 2013, Glenda Baskin Glover became president of Tennessee State, the same historically black university that she graduated from in 1974.

Following are three key questions campus leaders must consider when offering financial training to the board of trustees.

It has become increasingly difficult for educators and policymakers to get a firm grasp on exactly how many students persist in their education goals because over half of bachelor’s degree recipients attend more than one post-secondary institution, and two-thirds of community college students are enrolled part-time. (Gettyimages.com: drogetnev).

It has become increasingly difficult for educators and policymakers to get a firm grasp on exactly how many students persist in their education goals.

Sheila Gestring is the 18th president at the University of South Dakota.

Sheila Gestring, chief financial officer and vice president of the University of South Dakota, took the helm as its 18th president in late June.

Gestring faces numerous challenges, such as finding ways to increase access for high-performing students who cannot afford tuition and easing budget constraints at the university’s law school.

Gestring started at the university in 2006 as a finance director and transitioned to assistant vice president of finance and administration.

Richard L. Riccardi is senior associate provost and dean of libraries at Rider University.

In this era of increased accountability, diminishing resources and fierce competition, institutions have begun to see a culture of data-informed decision-making as a necessity instead of a luxury.

Admissions at the University of Mississippi recently began incorporating language about landscaping services' many accomplishments in mailers to prospective students.

For example, they now mention various awards that the department has earned over the years, such as most beautiful campus by USA Today.

Others include "You had me at Hotty Toddy," an Ole Miss expression that people now relate to the five national championships that the university's landscaping services have won.

Where do campuses fall short on groundskeeping and landscaping, and what misconceptions do administrators outside of facilities departments have about groundskeeping?

Marion Technical College’s Buy-One, Get-One tuition model will fund all sophomore-year tuition costs for students working toward an associate’s degree.

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