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Articles: Administration & Management

Source: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics

Despite growth in the number of graduate degrees conferred, students have lacked vital information on the economic value of an advanced degree. A recent American Enterprise Institute report uses new data from Colorado, Florida and Texas to show that future earnings depend on the field of study.

ATHLETIC INCLUSION—The University of California, Irvine, fields competitive e-sports teams while working to diversify gaming.

Competitive, online video-gaming, also known as e-sports, checks several inclusive and low-cost boxes, and is growing quickly.

LEARNING BY DOING—Students who are a best fit for New York Institute of Technology tend to enjoy hands-on problem-solving and can pursue programs such as electrical and computer engineering.

College admissions teams now go beyond zip codes and SAT scores to micromatch students who are most likely to apply to, enroll in and succeed at their institutions.

In what ways do you see colleges falling short in utilizing data to make better admissions recruitment and acceptance decisions? What kinds of data should they be using more of or better?

“Many colleges are not viewing their admissions decisions through the lens of retention and degree completion. Institutions should understand the profile of their most successful students, refine their recruiting strategy accordingly and ensure they are allocating their financial aid to maximize both yield and retention.”

—Darren Catalano, CEO, HelioCampus

The Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) has launched a new consortium to address the needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

STACKS UPON STACKS—Cornell and Ithaca students not finding what they need in their home campus libraries can now visit the neighboring school for more options.

Sharing resources among campuses makes sense for more than economical reasons, as colleges are finding these opportunities can better serve busy students.

Like many other institutions, Cornell University participates in an interlibrary loan system for faculty, staff and students.

Borrow Direct (borrowdirect.org) went live in 1999 after founding institutions Columbia, Penn and Yale partnered with the Research Libraries Group to develop the program for “Ivy Plus” institutions.

Besides the three initial universities and Cornell, participants are Brown, Dartmouth, Harvard, University of Chicago, Johns Hopkins, MIT, Duke, Princeton and Stanford.

David P. Angel is president of Clark University in Massachusetts.

One area with tremendous promise is helping students to connect their liberal arts education to career paths after college

As chief of staff and vice president of strategy for Metropolitan State University of Denver, Catherine B. Lucas redefined the school’s brand in the higher education marketplace, spearheaded the legislative approval process to offer master’s degrees, and led the name-change transition from “college” to “university.”

We are in the business of teaching and learning. So why not expand our learning and explore our mistakes—and the lessons we absorb from them?

Mirta Martin will be the next president of Fairmont State University. She was previously president of Fort Hays State University in Kansas.

Mirta Martin has been named president of Fairmont State University in West Virginia.

Regulatory compliance buckets.

Ignoring compliance isn’t an option. Institutional leaders can take action to ensure they’re on the right track today and to reduce the drain on existing resources.

Wesleyan University (Connecticut), Lakeshore Technical College (Wisconsin) and 21 other institutions have recently licensed Prey Anti-Theft to protect their mobile devices.

Ronald K. Machtley is president of Bryant University in Rhode Island.

What’s more important in higher education: preparing for a profession or attaining a well-rounded liberal arts education? The answer is that in today’s world both are critical.

What are some ways that you’ve seen student services within residence halls grow to meet student needs and expectations?

“Letter-centric mailrooms are not prepared to handle the packages and the expectation of doorstep-service associated with e-commerce. Students want low-touch retail, and administrators want to offer streamlined, cost-effective and safe services.

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