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Articles: Administration & Management

Americans learned from the timeless wisdom of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: “Education must enable one to sift and weigh evidence, to discern the true from the false, the real from the unreal, and the facts from fiction.”

One of the great challenges of Community, Technical, and County Colleges is to provide quality, affordable higher learning to the broadest possible audience – a complex mission given the socioeconomic, educational, and health disparities that frequently find expression in the rise and fall of the Nation’s Post-Industrial Cities.

We hear it all the time—complaints about the inefficiency of public higher education in Massachusetts. These complaints are often based on the incorrect assumption that providing students with a choice—the choice of where, when, and what to study is necessarily inefficient. How do we provide choice in an efficient way? I’ll answer that from my corner of public higher education.  

It has become increasingly difficult for educators and policymakers to get a firm grasp on exactly how many students persist in their education goals because over half of bachelor’s degree recipients attend more than one post-secondary institution, and two-thirds of community college students are enrolled part-time. (Gettyimages.com: drogetnev).

It has become increasingly difficult for educators and policymakers to get a firm grasp on exactly how many students persist in their education goals.

Sheila Gestring is the 18th president at the University of South Dakota.

Sheila Gestring, chief financial officer and vice president of the University of South Dakota, took the helm as its 18th president in late June.

Gestring faces numerous challenges, such as finding ways to increase access for high-performing students who cannot afford tuition and easing budget constraints at the university’s law school.

Gestring started at the university in 2006 as a finance director and transitioned to assistant vice president of finance and administration.

Richard L. Riccardi is senior associate provost and dean of libraries at Rider University.

In this era of increased accountability, diminishing resources and fierce competition, institutions have begun to see a culture of data-informed decision-making as a necessity instead of a luxury.

Landscaping strives to achieve the following four goals as they prioritize a never-ending list of pressing everyday tasks as well as find time and resources for more intensive projects.

Admissions at the University of Mississippi recently began incorporating language about landscaping services' many accomplishments in mailers to prospective students.

For example, they now mention various awards that the department has earned over the years, such as most beautiful campus by USA Today.

Others include "You had me at Hotty Toddy," an Ole Miss expression that people now relate to the five national championships that the university's landscaping services have won.

Where do campuses fall short on groundskeeping and landscaping, and what misconceptions do administrators outside of facilities departments have about groundskeeping?

Marion Technical College’s Buy-One, Get-One tuition model will fund all sophomore-year tuition costs for students working toward an associate’s degree.

Campuses want to tighten security and turn information into action. This has caused an unprecedented surge in demand for safety and data personnel.

Patricia McGuire is president of Trinity Washington University. 

A recent report reveals that as many as 36 percent of students across socio-economic levels experience food insecurity at some point during their college days.

As more textbooks and other learning materials become digitized, institutions regularly face challenges in smoothly integrating all the different resources into the LMS and other campus networks.

Annual performance reviews are shunned for good reason. Many higher education institutions question the wisdom of this antiquated approach and are exploring alternatives.

Source: “College Completion Through a Latino Lens”; Excelencia in Education, 2018

Latino students complete degrees at lower rates than other ethnic groups—and are more likely to still be enrolled after six years. Higher ed institutions are developing supports as a result.

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