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Articles: Enrollment & Retention

What are the biggest roadblocks institutions face when it comes to adding/enhancing mobile donation options?

“Nothing is more frustrating than getting to the end of a payment process only to have it fail. This experience could cause a donor to give up and schools to lose valuable dollars. Advancement offices need a secure and reliable platform that allows them to raise funds anywhere, anytime, via any channel.”

—Heather Richmond, senior director of product management and marketing, TouchNet

It’s extremely challenging and costly to build an in-house mobile donation platform, not only because of the technology, but also because of privacy and compliance issues.

That’s why most universities choose to work with providers that have it all figured out, says Caryn Stein, vice president of  marketing at higher ed consulting firm Ruffalo Noel Levitz.

When vetting a vendor, keep these questions in mind:

Most institutions have barely scratched the surface of the latest innovations in mobile fundraising. Here are key actions recommended by those who are making headway.

Aim: To boost enrollment of the top 1 percent of high school students who qualify for Oregon State’s Presidential Scholarship, admissions officers treat academic standouts like blue-chip athletes.

The program began three years ago.


Link to main story: Colleges should always woo would-be students


In the box

Led by admissions offices, higher ed institutions are enticing accepted students to officially enroll by using innovative communication approaches, developing peer connections and making students feel as if they are already part of the family.

At the Hyatt Regency Cambridge, along the scenic Charles River overlooking Boston, a few dozen college presidents and provosts gathered in early May for a day focused on achieving campus harmony. Called the Campus Climate Summit: Getting from Contention to Consensus, the event was sponsored by Thoughtexchange, a provider of stakeholder engagement solutions for leaders of colleges and other organizations.

Taking on more loan debt with age.

Americans age 50 years and older saw their federal student loan debt grow by $18 billion between the second quarter of fiscal year 2017 and the first quarter of 2018.

Jack Buckley of the American Institutes for Research edited Measuring Success: Testing, Grades, and the Future of College Admissions (2018, Johns Hopkins).

Measuring Success: Testing, Grades, and the Future of College Admissions (2018, Johns Hopkins) investigates the implications of admissions testing with experts from both sides of the debate.

Providers were asked: How well are colleges using data to measure faculty performance, and what related areas need the most improvements?

“Colleges will typically show the faculty how their scores compare to others at the school, usually those in the same department. But they rarely ask the instructors how they plan to improve any low scores they've earned or coach them how to do so. Closing this feedback loop will improve the students' experience.”

—Howard Walters, SmartEvals.com

Jo Allen is president of Meredith College.

When it comes to risk management, a key fear is being blindsided by exposure we didn’t even know we had.

Measuring faculty effectiveness has never been a perfect science—and it has always held potential for contention among instructors and administrators.

COOKING UP BETTER HEALTH—Med students at The Goldring Center for Culinary Medicine at Tulane get hands-on culinary lessons to learn how food preparation and diet impact illness. The center was the first dedicated teaching kitchen to be implemented at a medical school.

More than 40 medical schools have added culinary medicine programs to the menu to help students better understand how to combat obesity, diabetes and other chronic diseases.

SAVE A LIFE—Bridgewater State Police Chief David Tillinghast kicked off the university’s Narcan program, which provides training on use of the overdose-reversal drug. It is stored in 50 public places across campus.

Training is underway at colleges and universities to teach more people how to administer the drug that reverses opioid overdoses.

In his trainings with students, faculty and staff, Detective Sgt. Robert McEvoy, of the Bridgewater State University Police in Massachusetts, details the following signs of an opioid overdose.

These signs are:


Link to main story: Colleges train to reverse opioid overdoses


A few months after Boston University’s successful merger with Wheelock College, the University of Massachusetts drew a greater degree of scrutiny for its acquisition of Mount Ida College.

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