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Articles: Enrollment & Retention

MAY THE FORCE BE WITH THEM—Graduates of USC’s Neighborhood Academic Initiative—a rigorous college-prep program for students from low-income communities near campus—got a ceremonial visit from actor Mark Hamill,  of Luke Skywalker and Star Wars fame, and some of his fictional antagonists.

A small change in admissions at many of the most selective colleges and universities could make a big difference to low-income learners. 

FINDINGS ANNOUNCED, CHARGES MADE—Timothy Piazza’s parents received the news on May 5 that the investigation of his death would result in criminal charges. The frat Beta Theta Pi and eight of its members face manslaughter charges.

The question of how to accommodate Greek life is a continued conundrum for college officials nationwide.

Connecticut State Colleges & Universities system President Mark Ojakian's strategy of consolidation and shared services, called Students First, should save at least $41 million annually.

Faced once again with state and federal funding cuts, Connecticut State Colleges & Universities system President Mark Ojakian has had to make some tough decisions to keep the 17-school system functioning.

SCHOLARLY PURSUITS— SUNY Oneonta awards badges to participants in its annual Research and Creativity Day. Each April, students present projects—from research papers to video documentaries—they’ve completed independently and with faculty mentors.

Diplomas—those venerable printed documents that lack hotlinks and interactivity features—have lost some of their luster.

Four-year private institutions continue to rely on—and increase—tuition discounts to attract students, but the strategy is not improving the bottom line.

Matthew Poslusny is senior vice president and provost at Meredith College in Raleigh, N.C.

Watching students receive their degrees fills us with pride. However, the ceremony itself often leaves us with dread. How long will it be? Will the names of the students be pronounced correctly?

Three actions for school administrators to take when spotting fraud.

The growth of online education has brought a wave of what’s often referred to as Title IV fraud, in reference to the federal student aid program.

​Criminals who receive financial aid fraudulently basically steal money from bona fide students and institutions.

It’s known that full-time students graduate more quickly and more often than do their part-time counterparts. But what about students who fluctuate between full- and part-time status?

Higher education needs to focus on employee development and start rebuilding their own farm systems. Why do so many colleges look externally for new talent instead of developing their employees? 

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT—At  The University of Arizona, academic advisors know that every student matters when it comes to retention, not just because each individual’s success is important but also because they realize that retaining just a few extra students raises overall retention rates.

There’s no doubt that higher ed institutions have access to tons of student data these days, but what separates actionable insights from analytics overload?

James Muyskens is a professor at the Graduate Center, CUNY, and former president of CUNY Queens College.

The weakest link in the expanding instructional continuum—where we are least successful—is in general education and freshman introductory courses.

It’s no coincidence that administrators at the College of Visual and Performing Arts at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro constantly inquire about student scores, and they have one of the highest retention rates on campus.

Rahul Choudaha is a higher ed consultant and CEO of DrEducation.

The current anti-immigrant rhetoric in the U.S. has collided with the economic challenges of source countries, creating a perfect storm for international student enrollment.

Almost every college and university has a version of a testing center, whether it’s a cramped space with a few desks designed for students with special needs, or an elaborate setup with multiple computer rooms, private cubicles and dozens of seats.

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