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Articles: Enrollment & Retention

In your experience, what is the biggest challenge for college dining halls in operating separate locations or kitchen areas dedicated to serving students with special diets?

Here are four strategies to successfully address and manage special dietary needs on campus.

Improving space utilization is a goal on every campus, with data analysis tools and software key to many efforts. Ultimately, there are different cases for different spaces.

Search committees and institutions recruiting academic leaders are often met with a major sticking point: the most appealing candidates often don’t have much fundraising experience. Yet in today’s climate, non-tuition sources of revenue are increasingly important and fundraising provides resources that can truly advance a university’s agenda. Leaders across campus—deans, program directors, functional administrators, research heads, and so on—must be capable of building donor relationships, “making the ask” and securing gifts.

As textbook sales have declined, campus stores are relying on promotions to attract students who might not otherwise have a reason to visit.

If you are tasked with driving enrollment for undergrad or grad programs, but your marketing teams are not taking advantage of the myriad of ways to personalize digital content to increase lead capture, enrollment and retention—you may be seeing the impact in your acceptance and yield figures. In this piece, we open up the new playbook for finding the right student prospects.

Source: Center for Collegiate Mental Health 2017 Annual Report, tiny.cc/CCMH

For the seventh straight year, the rate of students reporting they may harm themselves—and, in turn, who seek counseling—grew, according to a new report

The vast majority of community college athletic programs operate in relative obscurity, known mostly at the local level, if at all.

The obvious exception is the football team at East Mississippi Community College.

The Johnson Cornell Tech MBA is conferred by the Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management at Cornell University, but students don’t do all of their coursework at the Ithaca-based business school.

“Our Tech MBA is very unique in that our students are living and working with students from other [Cornell] programs in what we call ‘studio’ learning,” says Doug Stayman, associate dean at Cornell Tech and associate professor of marketing at the management school.

DOWN TO BUSINESS—Dean Idie Kesner (left) congratulates MBA for Educators graduate Casey Stansifer, a school district curriculum coordinator.

Applications to full-time, two-year MBA programs in the U.S. have been down since 2014, and this past fall, 64 percent of programs reported declines, says a survey report. 

ATHLETIC INCLUSION—The University of California, Irvine, fields competitive e-sports teams while working to diversify gaming.

Competitive, online video-gaming, also known as e-sports, checks several inclusive and low-cost boxes, and is growing quickly.

LEARNING BY DOING—Students who are a best fit for New York Institute of Technology tend to enjoy hands-on problem-solving and can pursue programs such as electrical and computer engineering.

College admissions teams now go beyond zip codes and SAT scores to micromatch students who are most likely to apply to, enroll in and succeed at their institutions.

In what ways do you see colleges falling short in utilizing data to make better admissions recruitment and acceptance decisions? What kinds of data should they be using more of or better?

“Many colleges are not viewing their admissions decisions through the lens of retention and degree completion. Institutions should understand the profile of their most successful students, refine their recruiting strategy accordingly and ensure they are allocating their financial aid to maximize both yield and retention.”

—Darren Catalano, CEO, HelioCampus

The finalized version of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act that President Trump signed into law poses less of a perceived threat to higher ed than the bill that passed the House.

Proponents say that people who use education-savings accounts will benefit from deductions in student loan interest.

Critics, however, predict that the doubling of the standard deduction will result in fewer philanthropic contributions to colleges and universities. —Steven Wyman-Blackburn

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